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THE 

WORLD WILL SOON BE 
£A</6#/iyVG A GAIN l 


Great DICTATOR 


THE 


WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY CHARLES CHAPLIN 

wuh PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAKIE • HENRY DANIELL* REGINALD GARDINER• BILLY GILBERT* MAURICE MOSCOVICK 
Released thru UNITED ARTISTS 


PRODUCED, 









Gltanlie GhaplUt H Book ! Tb 

screen . . in a history-making corned 
history of the world. For three years nl 
thru the doors of your theatre they w ' 
but big in production, it is a pictui 
assembled, with armies marching, 
"The electric brilliance of Paulettel 
dictator, Reginald Gardiner’s sly wit a| 
bled in a Chaplin comedy masterph 
word CHAPLIN. Sell him with the goal 
that is not only the greatest of his care 




































GluMhlm the Qneai 

THE GREAT DICTATOR 



most famous star in the history of the 
based on the most vital topic in the 
[ions have awaited its completion. Now 
come to see it. Not only big in its star, 
showing great scenes with thousands 
state dinners and magnificent festivities, 
jldard, Jack Oakie as the scowling rival 
a cast more important than ever assem- 
Tbere is no marquee magic like the 
mighty box-office results from a picture 
* but in all the years of motion pictures! 





iLi>Tuti ip© um?m 


Revive the Chaplin-Imitating 


Craze! 





First Day 



Third Day 


KIDS’ COLORING CONTEST 

Staple and time-tried though it is, the kids' coloring contest 
is such an inevitable form of show-selling on a Chaplin picture 
that we recommend it as a "must" in your campaign. The kids 
go for Charlie—and they'll itch to grab a crayon and act upon 
the invitation to color up the black-and-white sketches in your 
newspaper. 

Here are three immensely amusing Chaplin line sketches 
done by the famous artist, Hershfield. Plant them in a three-day 
series, and offer ducats to the youngsters who send in the best- 
colored complete set of three. Three days of attractive breaks 
on your show are a cinch for you if you promote this plant in your 
local paper. Order Mat No. 51 B, 30c; Cut, 50c. 



CHAPLIN IMPERSONATIONS 

£Rivn In SPclty, STAlmig/i SPcAcclb, 

SftcyA ’ SPccufo; Sic. x 

Kids love Charlie Chaplin and kids know Charlie Chaplin. Chaplin is the one great 
comedian who appeals to all ages and the amazing thing about his tremendous appeal is 
that kids who have never seen him on the screen know all about him—they know what 
he looks like and they're wondering how he'll sound. 

"The Great Dictator" is a kids' picture, make no mistake about that. This generation of 
children will laugh and cry with Charlie as kids have for more than twenty years. 

Every kid is a natural mimic and every kid likes to impersonate Charlie Chaplin. Set 
up contests in your lobby, through schools, boy scouts, clubs, etc. Give prizes to the kids 
who give the best imitations of the little man with the derby, moustache, big shoes and ^ 
baggy pants. 


FILL-IN 

DRAWING 

CONTEST 

Kids love to draw, and the 
familiar caricature of Charlie 
Chaplin is so easy that it makes 
an artist of every youngster. 

This one is perfect for news¬ 
paper cooperation or you can 
give away these incomplete 
drawings of Charlie. The win¬ 
ner of the contest is the kind 
who most cleverly completes 
the unfinished drawing. 

One of the big newspaper 
chains is having great success 
with a stunt of this type as a 
daily feature. They report that 
grown-ups as well as kids go 
for it big. That's why we sug¬ 
gest that you plug it for every¬ 
thing it's worth. 

Order this 2-col. Mat as No. 
52B, 30c; Cut, 50c. 


★ 



I 



POSTER CONTEST IN SCHOOLS 

Here's a natural for school cooperation. 

Most schools have drawing classes. Arrange to have the students compete in drawing a 
poster advertising Charlie Chaplin in "The Great Dictator" coming to your theatre. These can 
be in color or black and white. 

Get a couple of local advertising men to judge the finished posters and select the winners. 
Then display the winning posters in the lobby of your theatre and try to use some of therr^ 
in your advertising with the names of the winning artists. All the kids, their families and 
almost everybody else in town will be interested in this one! 


SCHOOL ESSAY CONTEST 

Get your local school to sponsor an essay contest on the subject of "Famous Comedians." 
Be sure to tie this in with Charlie Chaplin and "The Great Dictator." There are countless 
subjects to choose from. Four of the most famous funny men in the history of the world 
were Grimaud, Grock, Heuve and Toto. A little research by teachers on the careers of these A 
men will furnish interesting classroom material. The history of Charlie Chaplin, of course, 
should also be included. Another good essay would be, "Famous Funny Men. Why Chaplin Is 
Funniest." Prizes should be awarded the winners. 


Page Two 


















































Get Youngsters and Oldsters Doing it! 



It’s fun to be sold on a Chaplin picture—especially when you’re sold through 
the pleasant route of a Chaplin impersonation fad. 

So revive in your town the Charlie Chaplin imitating craze that has swept 
the nation periodically ever since Charlie became a world-famous comedian. 
You’ll find a number of suggestions for doing it on these pages—and you’ll be 
surprised at the variety of ways in which it can be done. There’s no pleasanter 
way, and no surer boxoffice-boosting way, to sell your new Chaplin show than 
by bringing out the Chaplin mimic in all the youngsters and oldsters in town! 



* 


“CHAPLIN DOUBLES” POP CONTEST 

Here's an added angle to the Chaplin impersonation contest. Plug this one 
heavily, in as many ways as possible, because it's one of the strongest show-selling 
stunts on this Chaplin laugh-fest. 

This "doubles" contest must be run with newspaper cooperation. The cooperating 
newspaper should run a daily story with a coupon attached, inviting kids and grownups 
to vote for the local kid (say under 16) who makes the best Chaplin "double" or im¬ 
personator. The kid receiving the greatest number of votes (one to a coupon) is the 
winner and receives a prize. 

Select six (or more) finalists and have the final judging on the stage of your theatre 
in an impersonation contest to be judged by audience acclaim. 

Many newspapers today run a department which looks like a miniature newspaper 
and is exclusively for juvenile readers. If your local newspaper has such a department, 
it's the perfect place for planting this stunt. 




EVERY MAN A “GREAT DICTATOR”! 

3o SPo&e SBeAind c €Aafi/in Cut out 

A Chaplin picture is the perfect attraction on which to use this 
lobby gag! Let patrons see themselves as Charlie Chaplin and have 
themselves photographed as Chaplin by installing a life-size cutout 
of Charlie in your lobby, with the head missing. Still No. Pub-57 
gives you a swell subject for blowup of Chaplin as "The Great 
Dictator"—or if you prefer to use Charlie in the tramp costume, try 
Still No. 238. 

Spotlight the cutout in a corner of your outside lobby, hang a 
mirror opposite it, and invite the fans to step behind it, let their 
heads protrude above the Chaplin figure, and take a look at them¬ 
selves in Charlie's role. To heighten the stunt, provide a derby and 
a paper mustache for each poser. A local photographer will be glad 
to take snapshots for those who want them; and a layout of such 
pictures of prominent locals posing as Charlie Chaplin would make 
a swell publicity break in the local newspaper. 


“GREAT DICTATOR” 
COSTUME PARTY 


You'll set the town on its ear by organizing a costume affair 
at which guests must arrive appareled as Charlie Chaplin in "The 
Great Dictator" or as some other well-known dictator of fact or 
fiction. 

Work it with one of the high-standing welfare organizations 
in your town, which go for such parties in their fund-raising 
campaigns. An arrangement might be made for combination 
tickets to the costume ball and your opening—part of the pro¬ 
ceeds, of course, to go to the charity. It's the kind of affair to 
which local celebrities will flock, assuring you a real publicity 
splash in the papers and all over town. 

Be sure that "Great Dictator" stills, banners, etc. are very 
much in evidence in the advertising of the affair, as well as in 
the hall where it is held. Special events, such as a Charlie 
Chaplin flatfoot dance contest (see the series of stills on Page 
2) can be held for extra fun and show-selling on your Chaplin 
rib-busting show. 



IMPERSONATE THE NEW 
CHARLIE, TOO 

Every kid, and most grownups, will impersonate Chaplin in 
his traditional tramp character at the drop of a hat or the donning 
of a derby. But you'll want them to "get" and remember Char¬ 
lie's new character, as the Great Dictator, too! And the best way 
to do it is to promote impersonations of Chaplin as Hynkel in 
"The Great Dictator." A brief description of the kind of role 
Charlie plays in this picture, or a reproduction of a still, will 
convey the character quickly enough—and Charlie as Hynkel has 
just as hilarious impersonation possibilities as the other Charlie. 

So get the kids and their elders to do Hynkel-Chaplin imper¬ 
sonations, too! A visored cap and a mustache are all the costume 
they'll need. "The Great Dictator" saluting, or strutting about 
giving orders, or making a speech, or thinking great thoughts— 
these are sufficient subject matter to bring out the natural mimic 
in everybody. Stage the impersonations as contests on your stage 
or in the lobby, at parties, school assemblies, boys' clubs, etc. 


Page Three 











































ifxtq 1 UwAifinia asr aiD 



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Chaplin as the mighty "Dictator" with a loony look in his eye—Chaplin as the world-plotting confrere of the bulgy-faced Napaloni and the 
bespangled fat boy—and Charlie as the wistful little tramp in love with a ragged nymph—there you have the showmanship essentials of your 
hilarious picture which you'll want to drive home to the customers from your marquee. 

Illustrated above is a blueprint suggestion of how you can get these elements across, using illustrative material available for blowup from 
the stills. The group at the left is cut out from Stills PI 66, PI 62, PI 92; the large Chaplin figure is Still No. Pub-73; the Goddard cutout at the 
right is from Still No. P35. Have them blown up good and big, and colored for your marquee display; and for animated effects you can revolve 
the globe or make Chaplin's arm rise and fall by using a concealed motor and rocker arm attachment. 



Facing Lobby Facing Street 

“LAUGH” COPY DISPLAY 


For a dramatic spectacle it's "See" copy . . . but for the side-shaking mirth 
marathon that is "The Great Dictator" you'll want to blazon "LAUGH" copy 
to the customers in your lobby. 

Set up a 40x60 easel display, dominated by a "Dictator" cutout (the one 
shown here is from Still No. P-151), with several punch lines each selling one 
of the hilarity angles of the show, each emphasized by a comedy scene still. 
Here are some lines: 

"LAUGH at the Dancing Dictator as he trips the light bombastic on a heavy 
heifer's hooves!" (Still No. P208—Chaplin dancing) 

"LAUGH at the hop-headed Hynkel as he compares Ersatz notes with 
'Noodle' Napaloni!" (Still No. P200—Chaplin and Oakie holding dishes of 
food) 

"LAUGH at Charlie's great broadcast—the battiest barrage of boisterous 
blah ever heard on long or short wave!" (Still No. PI 48—Chaplin speech) 
"LAUGH at the ducking Dictator, dunked by a shotgun's shimmy!" (Still 
No. P318—Chaplin falling into lake) 

"LAUGH at the million and one side-splitting situations in Charlie Chap¬ 
lin's funniest show of all time!" (Any comedy scene) 


“GREAT DICTATOR” BREAKS THROUGH! 


For a unique teaser display that punches home beautifully the progress 
of Chaplin in this picture from timid little waif to dictator, use a two-sided 
vertical display board with blowup cutouts of the two special stills illustrated 
above. 

Your cutout of the tramp figure should be made of flexible material to 
permit of bending it slightly, so that the figure of Charlie actually seems to 
be leaning through the board. On the other side place the "Dictator" head 
from Still No. Pub-73. 

This is a teaser with a sock suggestion all its own, and you will want to 
omit the usual ad lines and billing. We suggest using no copy at all on the 
outer side, and only the word "Coming!" on the inside. 



CHAPLIN TALKS-CHAPLIN DANCES 1 

SBef //ie iPt'c/n'ieA ■%// //te / 

At least two of the socko still sequences illustrated on 
Pages 10-1 1 are naturals for lobby displays that will sell the 
hysterical hilarity of this show better than many thousands 
of words. 

Set them up on lobby panels, with caption copy which 
you can lift or adapt from the captions under the picture 
strips. The stills used on the "Chaplin Talks" display shown 
here at left are Publicity 106, 104, 105, 95, and 109. Stills 
used on the "Chaplin Dances" panel at right are P223, P208, 
P219, P221, P222, P224. 

Get these displays up in your lobby or out in front; and 
place similar ones in store windows or any other spot in town 
where you can find space for a display that trumpets the 
greatest entertainment news of a decade! 



Page Four 



























I fjaLe like Wost oj JLoUn] ^decorations 



The very comprehensive line of banners, streamers, flags, standards, etc. that has been pre¬ 
pared for this picture makes your lobby-decorating problem an easy one, and provides you with 
the material with which to get across to the fans with the most effective ticket-selling punch 
the promise of delightful entertainment in your new Chaplin show! 

Above is a detailed suggestion for practical application of the banner accessories that are 
illustrated on this page and page 24. The heads of Chaplin shown are similar to those which 
you can cut out from the poster paper and stills; while the upright streamers, running fans, and 
banners are among the Liberman accessories available to you on order. Festoon your lobby, in 
addition, with streamers of Chaplin canes and derbies; and add a note of color with balloon 
clusters on the walls and ceiling. 

Careful attention to your lobby decorations will assure top box-office results where they 
will do the most good—right where the tickets are bought! 


Id' X 18" 

LOBBY 

STREAMER 

This streamer banner 
is equipped with cross¬ 
bar and tassels to facili¬ 
tate hanging. Made of 
cotton and finished 
with fringe at the bot¬ 
tom. This banner is 10 
ft. long and 18 inches 
wide. Available on a 
rental basis. For special 
United Artists streamer 
see page 24. 



4 Vi ‘ BANNER 

Here is the special 4 1 / 2 / silk banner 
made by United Artists for your lobby 
selling on "The Great Dictator." Price, 
outright sale only, $1.75. For detailed 
description see page 24. 


8' X 20' 

OUTDOOR 

STREAMER 

These streamers can 
be used on the face of 
the building above the 
marquee or above the 
marquee. They are 3 
ft. wide and 20 ft. long, 
equipped with grom¬ 
mets and ready to hang. 
Available on a rental 
basis. Streamers and 
bunting shown on this 
page, and other items 
made by Liberman Flag 
and Valance Co., 71 
Fifth Ave., New York. 




Above—Short and long fans. Right—Running fans. 



RED, WHITE AND BLUE BUNTING 

Bunting is 36" wide and can be had in any length. The illustra¬ 
tions suggest the various uses for draping this bunting. It can be kept 
permanently by the theatre for use on all gala patriotic and anniver¬ 
sary occasions. Price 40c per yard. 


Page Five 

































































































WNCH 


, <^fS. 

V lN ° A 

P „ t Vanambo'o"«’" bo „„ered 
P ,r theatre- ^ a (theatre) 
V ° nv . “Just in cOS ® h Ue« °» 
COP n over-\o° gh t S "Jo 0 cca- 

«° uW n 

' n * . “achon v a ^an 

h° 9 W'« M 

°° a *r^" eaw J 

»"'« 0,copv ’ 


BUCKING 
COMEDY CAR 

An old car, with rear wheels re¬ 
made so that they are off-center, 
will buck around town with plenty 
of accompanying laughs. Ban¬ 
nered copy, featuring head of 
Chaplin, reads: "Rocking the 
town with laughter —Chaplin as 
The Great Dictator’!" 


nKr * c SO ID/ 


* 


laugh 

SCHEDULE 

he hn_ 


P time schedule 1U ' ctat ° r " as 
! n Q the high snnf m - phasiz ' 

“net,on with 5 m c °n- 

li'ne fo r earhu Start <ng 

Heading. *r£ h lowing 
Laughs in ‘Th'r ' table of 
?P r (Vote e £ reat Vet? 

< tlmes should ben* 5 J arf ing 

\ e *er P ossiuJ 1 ? ted »he?. 

•SSSy ir ur A 


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THE 


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r a m'^ e V 

o0 set up \ o0 gh- 
You c . ctreaor t G . 

c °' ch Me c rr Q a- 

«* '^e"G«°' 

C ° upr— topro^ 0 ' . e 
spe ,o,' S " ca»V 

'"added s»ee« *«'/ 


/COMIC PAGE "'■j I 

/ TIEUP \( ) \ 

/Tie in with a local newspaper's 

I comic pages by running a co- \ /PHOTO CONTES 
oDerative institutional ad, with \ / Run a "smiles" contest ' 

p lininn ud "The Great / ,n your lobby, based 
copy lining P , . I / on newspaper-spon- 

Dictator" as the great laug I j sored snapshots of peo- 

i of all time. The idea / | p| e leaving your thea¬ 

tre after seeing "The 

Great Dictator". Biggest 
and best laugh of each 
day wins a prize, and 
\person involved must/ 
\identify himself./^ 


,.j up "The Great 
Dictator as the great laugh- 
maker of all time. The idea 
V sells the comic pages strongly, > 
\ and of course does a job / 
for your show. / 


IN » t0 


f IN 9 .x -, n 

A good'^^je^ndor 
wed in a s . when d»s 
b t?c o laugh .^he> 

f»c \augh s „'« e d can also 

V D telou r^CcSfy 

X tov/n on « s 


/ LAU <*H records X 

f B rl Ca | f u nfinu °us hilarity 

SVStlm e h° bby - ° Ver y ° Ur P - A 
system by using a sure-fire 

laugh record. Two such rec¬ 
ords available are.- No 5002 
group of men and women 

No^Jm!? c ° ntinuou sly; and 
No. 4024 —two men laughina 
boisterously. Both have repeal 
hnes ,n center for continuous 
Playing Order them direct at 

ea v5o°? T ' J - VALENTINO 

729 Seventh Ave. > 
New York. ' / 


CRITIC HAS 


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,ell ed 


co* 


\ed 

otr' eS 


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ban' 

this 


This '■ 


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tono'' 


ever 


,es L' 

,od e • 


wmiiw nMO run \ 

low up a good photograph 
of an important critic or lo¬ 
cal celebrity—showing him 
or her laughing vigorously 
—for lobby purposes. Catch¬ 
line and copy should em¬ 
phasize the laugh angle, 
k. possibly with a auot- J 


' tour ing 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

^ t cuP a a S' in - Godd °r d 

« p -'-acc o ; p a on tr i ! OWn 

, edy Photographer^ hI ° °° m ' 

h ,s shot of the r, • Sets Up 
af ter much froubl Sm9 Couple > 


/ash copy Qn 

Grep t Dictator". 


me unyic, / 

ly with a quoted / cE.T^ 

comment. / / S A* ^ 

S / . kVJGH 




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thTs CQrrip s 

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\ 90ln 9fn n ' Q nd iC ' 01 

X Dir? e ‘ T °e C np t 

u, ctato r \* Gr eaty 


\ 


LAUGH STUNTS 




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PA 


A1 




PAULETTE AS A STAR 

Introduced to film audiences five years ago in 
Charlie Chaplin's "Modern Times," Paulette Goddard 
today is one of the most glamorous and talented ac¬ 
tresses in Hollywood. Now a star in her own right, 
lovely Paulette has "returned home" to appear as 
Charlie s leading lady in "The Great Dictator." 

She has been featured in such films as "The Young 
In Heart," "Dramatic School," "The Women," "The 
Cat and the Canary" and "The Ghost Breakers." 

Sell Paulette as one of Hollywood's topflight stars 
—not just a leading lady but a star in her own right— 
with a lobby display pointing up her progress from 
"Modern Times" to "The Great Dictator." Stills simi¬ 
lar to those shown above are available at 10c each— 
order PG-1, PG-2, PG-3, PG-4, PG-5, PG-6. Contrast 
these with a big blowup still from her latest hit, with 
copy stressing the progress Paulette has made in 
between! 


GODDARD NEWS BREAKS 

In addition to lobby display, you should give full 
emphasis to exploitation of Paulette Goddard as the shining 
feminine star of the picture by cracking the newspaper 
columns as often as possible with the many excellent per¬ 
sonality and feature stories and photo mats which you will 
find in the Publicity Section of this pressbook. Paulette 
has already been publicized in nationally released news 
stories and pictures as Chaplin's leading lady. The opening 
of the picture in your town will make her important local 
news that will find ready space in your paper. 

* 


STAGE A TALENT HUNT 

tyi/io’b f/ie “Sfcca/ SPauleffle” 

Charlie Chaplin discovered Paul¬ 
ette Goddard and made her his lead¬ 
ing lady in "Modern Times" five years 
ago. Maybe you have a potential 
Paulette Goddard in your town. Stage 
a talent hunt and find out! Invite 
girls between the ages of 15 and 25 
to compete, with final eliminations 
held on your theatre stage. The win¬ 
ner should be rewarded with a suit¬ 
able prize. 

In addition to the obvious advan¬ 
tages, this talent hunt will furnish 
you with a stage show for the even¬ 
ing that surpasses in interest any¬ 
thing you could buy. All girls are 
movie struck and the reply to this 
contest should be tremendous. 

Tied with the local newspaper, it 
will get a lot of free space. Local 
papers like to print pictures of pretty 
local girls. Capitalize on this and 
sell the paper! 

Persuade your local newspaper 
to announce the contest and invite 
aspirants among the local girls to 
submit their pictures as the first step 
in the competition. The most beau¬ 
tiful picture printed each day will 
give your paper the kind of 
"glamour" feature it wants, and will 
keep the publicity boiling for your 
show. 


>f 


BEAUTY TIEUPS 

The scene in the picture where Chaplin 
gives Paulette Goddard an impromptu 
beauty treatment and transforms her from 
a begrimed little slavey back to her radiant¬ 
looking self, gives you your takeoff for local 
tieups with beauty shops around town. Build 
window displays around a set of Goddard 
stills showing her in both characters in the 
film; both "before" and "after" beauty 
treatment, with copy emphasizing the God¬ 
dard glamour and Paulette as a versatile star. 




WRITE A GAG 
for PAULETTE 


MOST BEAUTIFUL PATCHED 
COSTUME FOR PAULETTE 

Patched costumes for girls are a popular fad—national de¬ 
signers and leading New York department stores are featuring this 
cute, youthful new style feature. And there's your natural tie-in 
for extra publicity breaks on Paulette Goddard and the role she 
plays in "The Great Dictator." 

Tie with a local store, with the aid of your newspaper or radio 
station, to sponsor a contest in which girls are invited to submit 
the most beautiful patched costume. Link it with Paulette by 
running her stills in connection with the contest, and explain that 
Paulette wears these simple, peasant clothes with patches—patches 
designed for her by Charlie Chaplin himself. 

The winning costume designs should be displayed in your lobby 
and also reproduced on the newspaper's fashion page. And if 
possible, get the co-operating store to make actual use of them in 
its line of patched costumes for girls. 



Nearly everybody fancies himself as a 
humorist. That's why this stunt has a uni¬ 
versal appeal. 

Above are four stills showing Charlie 
Chaplin and Paulette Goddard. You can see 
what Charlie is saying. The idea is to write 
an answering gag for Goddard—one that will 
suggest the explosive hilarity of the show. 
Paulette must say something that is funny 
and clever and yet must answer what Charlie 
is saying to her. 

The fans will go for this chance to shine 
at the comeback wisecrack—and at the 
same time to compete for prizes or tickets 
to the show. An added appeal of this con¬ 
test is that it presents Charlie Chaplin talk¬ 
ing for the first time. Get your newspaper 
to run it as a daily series, with the publicity 
bally that it rates. A running story should 
accompany each day's still, with the best 
gags submitted so far by readers, etc. These 
stills are available in 2-column size (illus¬ 
trations reduced here. Order the complete 
set on Mat No. 45-B—30c; Cut—50c. 


Page Seven 

















































DICTATORS 9 MOTORCADE 


^om&wie ^ou/i SBup SPafaide $au<ffi=^ettiri<j ‘'Qfitda/al ” 


Here's a stunt that's more modern than tomorrow's headlines! Contact a 
local automobile dealer and get him to supply six or seven open cars. Hire a 
number of Chaplin impersonators, dress them as ''The Great Dictator" and put 
one in each car. Each dictator should stand in the back of the car and give out 
with frequent salutes. The cars can be used together and separately for ter¬ 
rific ballyhoo. 

Combine this "Dictators' Motorcade" with a huge parade to your theatre, 
bringing out all kids' organizations such as boy scouts, boys' clubs, schools, etc., 


with boys' bands and other local bands. A whole company of kid Chaplin im¬ 
personators, wearing derbies and moustaches and carrying canes, would give a 
terrific fillup to the stunt. 

You can't go overboard on this stunt no matter how elaborately you go into 
it. It is the slickest attention-getter you've heard of in many years. If handled 
properly, it's a cinch to get plenty of valuable space in your local newspapers 
and perhaps national picture breaks from syndicates. 

This one just can't miss! 


* 



Send a sound truck all over town with a man at the mike 
who will tell people about the picture as follows: 

"It's here, the picture that the whole world has been 
awaiting for five years—Charlie Chaplin in 'The Great Dic¬ 
tator,' the greatest picture Charlie has ever made and the 
funniest. 'The Great Dictator' is the picture that has every¬ 
thing and, in addition, Charlie TALKS! What does he look 
like as 'The Great Dictator?' How does he sound? You'll 
have to go to the Gem Theatre to find out." 



Here's one that will draw the crowds and make everybody 
in town "Great Distator" minded. 

It takes thirteen men to spell out C-H-A-P-L-l-N 
l-S H-E-R-E but you'll get more word of mouth advertising 
than you ever got before. Each man should wear a sandwich 
board with a single letter on the front and an announcement 
on the back that "The Great Dictator" is coming to your 
theatre. 

Line them up at busy corners and you'll stop traffic for 
blocks. The traffic cops may be unhappy but the cash register 
in your box-office will sing a happy song. 


“DICTATOR” ON YOUR MARQUEE 


Capitalize on the association of dictators with balconies. All your patrons have seen 
countless pictures of Hitler and Mussolini making speeches from balconies. 

Use the marquee of your theatre and different balconies around town to show off YOUR 
dictators. Be sure that each dictator is dressed properly with the double-cross emblem on 
cap and arm band. Instruct each dictator to salute the crowd frequently. He can use the 
salutes and also a couple of comic ones. 

It might also be a good idea to have your dictators wave the crowds in the direction of 
your theatre. As a matter of fact, it's a very necessary idea. 


“CHAPLIN TALKS” 
OUTDOOR BALLY 

One of the strongest show selling points in "The 
Great Dictator" is that Charlie Chaplin finally TALKS! 
Sell this to the hilt. 

Everybody in the country wants to know what he 
sounds like. Make them come to your theatre to find 
out but don't make a secret of the fact that he TALKS. 

Dress your bally man as "The Great Dictator." This 
will attract plenty of attention in itself. Be sure he 
wears a big sandwich board with this message on front 
and back: 

CHAPLIN TALKS 
In "The Great Dictator" 
at the Gem Theatre 




Release a cloud of balloons from your marquee at a previously announced time, and let 
it be known that a pair of tickets to the picture will be tied to several of the balloons. Work 
with boys' organizations to marshal a crowd of kids near the theatre at the time of releasing 
the balloons. The resulting scramble to catch the ducat-bearing floaters will be worth a 
layout of pictures to your local paper, so be sure that the stunt is covered by a cameraman. 


Page Eight 









































SPtomte/e SPAcm cm ’ diadcv StypUMnA 

All kids know and love Charlie Chaplin, and a kid radio program is the perfect spot to promote "The Great Dictator." 

If one of your local radio stations has a kid program, either performed by kids or especially for them, persuade them to mention that Charlie 
Chaplin is coming to town in his new picture, "The Great Dictator," which is the funniest picture he has ever made. 

You can probably persuade the station to devote one program to Chaplin and what he has meant to the children of America for the past 
twenty years. 

If no kid show is current on your local station, talk to the program director and get him to stage one. It's a sure fire draw for the station 
as well as for your theatre. 


LAUGH BALLY RECORD 

Broadcast hilarity from your lobby to the neighbors and passersby while 
your great Chaplin comedy is showing. The laugh record is a time-tried 
exploitation stunt, but never more in the groove than on this picture. For a 
boisterous laugh record with repeat line that can be played continuously over 
your P.A. system, order laugh record No. 4024 from T. J. Valentino, 729 
Seventh Ave., New York. For further details and price, see page 6. 



Your local radio station undoubtedly runs one or more quiz programs. 
Talk to the program director and make arrangements to plant special ques¬ 
tions about Charlie Chaplin and "The Great Dictator" wherever possible. 
V^_ There are at least four types of quiz programs that are extremely popular 
at the moment. Here are a few sample questions for all of them. 

1. “Information Please” Program 

What three screen stars who achieved their greatest fame in America, 
were born in England? Answer:—Vivien Leigh, star of "Gone With 
the Wind"; Charles Laughton, star of "Mutiny on the Bounty"; Charlie 
Chaplin, star of "The Great Dictator." 

2. “What’s My Name” Program 

What great comedian was born in London in 1889. He came to this 
country with a vaudeville troupe in 1910. He is the greatest comedian 
the screen has ever known although he has never talked. He talks in 
his newest picture, "The Great Dictator." 

3. “True Or False” Program 

In his newest picture, "The Great Dictator," Charlie Chaplin's voice is 
heard on the screen for the first time. Answer: False—he sang a song 
in "Modern Times." 

- 

/. v 4- Qeneral Quiz 

Any kind of question about Chaplin or his pictures, old or new, will 
excite immediate interest both in a quiz conductor and his audiences. 


STAGE HOME INTERVIEWS 

Your local station may have a "Let's Visit" program where announcers 
go into people's homes to interview them on various subjects. 

Arrange to have a series of interviews about Charlie Chaplin, his life 
and his career. It will furnish plenty of interesting listening. Of course, 
you mustn't forget a few questions about "The Great Dictator" and at least 
one that will bring out the fact that Chaplin finally talks. 



Your local radio station must have an amateur show: Arrange to tie in 
with this show for a special laugh contest. Tell the contestants to think 
of the funniest Charlie Chaplin scene they ever saw and to let loose with 
the guffaws. The contestants with the most infectious laugh wins. 

This is an easy contest to stage and judge. The winner is the contestant 
who draws the most laughter from the studio audience. 


GAG PROGRAM FOR SECRETARIES- 
“WHO’S FAVORITE DICTATOR?” 


Here's a stunt that's sure fire for your local station. It can be broadcast 
from the studio or from the lobby of your theatre. The idea is to invite all 
the secretaries and stenographers to participate in a program called, "Who's 
Your Favorite Dictator?" 

Since all the girls take dictation and most of them like to talk about 
the boss, you should get some very interesting and highly amusing answers. 
Have them discuss the different moods and peculiarities of their various 
"dictators." 


Page Nine 
























"THE GREAT 


PLANT SENSATIONAL 
NEWSPAPER STRIPS 


Every newspaper in the country WANTS to print pictures of Charlie Chaplin as “’The Great Dictator,” 
the most discussed stills from the most discussed picture of all time. Countless pictures have already been 
printed in the top newspapers and magazines of the country but these strips are completely NEW. They are 
available only through United Artists. 

We offer five strips and suggest that they be planted as a series, one strip eacli day. They can, of course, 
be used separately but many newspapers will want tlie whole series. Here is a really outstanding service for 
newspapers in a series of strips that will sell “The Great Dictator” as it should be sold. 

The five strips are: “The Great Dictator” Broadcasts, Love Comes To Charlie, “The Great Dictator” 
Relaxes, Chaplin Talks and The Dancing Dictator. 



Even “The Great Dictator” has his lighter moments—at least he’s light 
on his partner's feet. In the first picture, Hynkel invites his partner 
to waltz. In the second picture he decides not to waltz. In the third 
picture he seems to regret what he started in the first pic¬ 
ture and in the fourth, the rhythm's got him. In case you 
haven’t guessed it already, Charlie Chaplin is Hynkel, “The Great 
Dictator” in the United Artists release of the same name, coming 
on ........ to the . Theatre, 


Each of the four strips at the right 
is matted (pictures only, type to be 
set locally) in full newspaper page 
width—sixteen inches ivide. Your 
newspaper will probably want to 
run them all in a series. Individual 
photos can of course be cut apart in 
mats for different shaped layout 
according to individual newspaper's 
requirements. Order mats direct 
from Exploitation Dept., United 
Artists Corp., 729 Seventh Avenue, 
New York City. 


The vertical strip at the left is 
matted in two-column width 
(4" wide), shown here in full 
size, including type. Order it 
direct from United Artists 
Exploitation Dept. Mat No. 
5 OR—30c,■ Cut —50c. 




THE SOUND AND THE FUEHRER! 
Broadcasting in comparative privacy 
at a meeting of 2,000,000 party 


LOVE COMES TO 



Playing a wistful, timid little barber 
in the early sequences of his new 
comedy, “The Great Dictator,” 
Charlie Chaplin finds his truelove in 

CHAPLIN TALKS! 



The biggest movie news in many 
years is contained in the brief state¬ 
ment that Chaplin talks in “The 

"THE GREAT 



Page Ten 


“The Great Dictator” goes in for a 
bit of plain and fancy relaxation 
with a gun to keep away the mos- 


























DICTATOR” BROADCASTS 


members and five microphones (for those who 
couldn’t get there), “The Great Dictator” says a few 
words with a couple of hundred gestures. “We’ve 
gotta have lebensraum,” he screams, and then pauses 

CHARLIE! 


for a double salute. Crossing his arms and popping 
his eyeballs, he goes on to explain that he’s a 
peace-loving man and will kill any so-and-so who 
doesn’t agree with him. Finally, he pounds his 


heart (if any) and yells that next year there will 
be more conquests, more ersatz and more taxes for 
the axis. Quite a heil storm! (Order Mat I\o. 46B 
— 30c; Cut — 30c.) 




the person of Paulette Goddard, as a comely peasant 
girl. Introducing himself with his famous gallantry, 
Charlie takes her for a walk, pausing only momen¬ 
tarily to hide discreetly in a doorway when he hears 


a detachment of storm troopers march by in the dis¬ 
tance. Passing a street vendor, Charlie solidifies his 
standing with the fair one by buying her some penny 
souvenirs. And so, arm in arm, they wend their peace¬ 


ful way through the streets of the town, happy in the 
knowledge that whatever strange or momentous ex¬ 
periences may befall Charlie in the future, they have 
had their moment of idyllic romance. ( Order Mat 
No. 47B—30c; Cut—50c.) 




Great Dictator.” The inimitable Charlie (most imi¬ 
tated man in the world) will be heard as well as seen 
on the screen for the first time. These pictures are 

DICTATOR" RELAXES 


from the world war sequence of “The Great Dictator” 
when Charlie is a common soldier in the front line 
trenches. Most people will be surprised at Chaplin’s 


excellent speaking voice. He had considerable ex¬ 
perience on the English stage before coming to this 
country and motion pictures more than 20 years ago. 
(Order Mat No. 48B—30c; Cut—50c.) 



quitoes and an atomizer to keep away the germs. 
In the first picture, the great man is just relaxing. 
In the second, he feels a germ coming on. Then 


he draws a bead on a mosquito but the gun is more 
powerful than he imagined. The dictator loses 
his equilibrium (to say the least) and calls for the 


army and navy. The rescue squad doesn’t arrive 
in time as the furious Feuhrer gets an unwanted 
cooling off. (Mat 49B — 30c; Cut — 50c.) 


Page Eleven 


















The immortal Knight of the Baggy Pants, world’s 
most famous character, alters no whit from 
generation to generation of moviegoers 


and delicious manner of lashing thwarting of a. suicide at a river’s 
out at dictators. His stake in it, edge in “City Lights”; or the 
therefore, is great—greater than faun-like routine with a pair of 
in any picture he has ever made, monkey-wrenches when he went 
That he has faith in “The Great pleasantly berserk in “Modern 
Dictator” to bring him an ade- Times.” 

quate return at the box-office goes It is the same inimitable faculty 
without saying. But the fact re- and facility which, in the last 
mains, nevertheless, that he is analysis, is the essence of the 
backing it to the fullest with his humor of Chaplin and the fun of 
own money, more money than he “The Great Dictator.” 
has ever invested—a sum around Chaplin’s genius for satire that 
two and a half million dollars! is first and foremost uproariously 
For this picture Chaplin aban- funny is shown to superlative ad- 
donecl the painted backdrop and vantage in a scene in which, as 
the flat two-dimensional perspec- Hynkel, he does a sort of ritual 
tives of his earlier pictures. He dance around a terrestrial globe. 

His expressions, as he regards 
first one and then another coun- 
Hggp*. try on the globe, go from the ra¬ 

pacious to the sublime, running 
Hk < '' a full gamut in between; and the 

WUL. jj jjp — movements of his body, of course, 

Hill v v are perfectly attuned. 

1HL Chaplin the expert—the expert 

A mechanic in “Modern Times,” the 

' jk expert prizefighter in “City 

9HEw jk Lights”—is the expert barber in 

; ' ||m “The Great Dictator.” He has 

Jr ^ JHflk mastered the motions of barber- 

jflf|l p m Bm mg to super-perfection, and thus 

li||| wrings comedy from it. In one 

side-splitting sequence he lathers 
Chester Conklin to the music of, 
M and in perfect time to, “The Ilun- 

HjHjppi M garian Rhapsody.” 

-/He Of his ballroom dance, at a re- 

1® t.option, with the overweight Ma- 
nHHHEp \ ^ m dame Napaloni, little is known 

beyond the fact that the action 
$§& had to he -topped time and again 

HV because the rest of the cast ruined 
takes with their laughter. 


"Modern Times”, Charlie’s most recent picture 
before "The Great Dictator”, satirized the mechan¬ 
ization of industry 


has been to make people laugh! 

In a sense, “The Great Dicta¬ 
tor” represents the exercising by 
Chaplin of his fullest preroga¬ 
tive: the deliverance of a hearty, 
side-splitting, uproarious, lusty 
belly-laugh at dictators. It repre¬ 
sents a culmination of his ac¬ 
quired wisdom and his matured 
comic genius. The fool dared 
laugh at Kings. Chaplin not only 
dares—but enjoys—a bellow at 
the arch-villains of the day. 

Chaplin talks! The phrase is 
something to conjure with. In 
the last ten years, more has been 
written about the question of 
whgher Chaplin would ever speak 
in phi ms than about seeihingly 
weightier problems. That discus¬ 
sion about this point has been 
world-wide and profound should 
occasion no surprise. Chaplin is 
a world-figure, and people take 
their fun seriously. 

^jp'om Charlie’s own viewpoint, 
the decision to talk created more 
problems than the mere physical 
one of adding sound equipment to 
his studios. To start, he was faced 
with the problem of giving voice 
to the little tramp, the most self- 


Charlie plays a dual role in the 
film—he is both a little Jewish 
barber, and Hynkel, the feared 
dictator of Tomania. 

For the characterization of the 
barber (the familiar little tramp 
in a thin disguise) Chaplin has 
kept dialogue at a minimum, 
monosyllabic, in keeping with the 
character. As Hynkel, the dicta¬ 
tor, he speaks in a rich and comic 
guttural, a few phrases of English 


In Carmen (above) 
Charlie burlesqued the he¬ 
roic bombast of grand 
opera, and in "The Hank” 
(right) he paid his respects 
to the "idle rich” 


flh "The Great Dictator” Cnarlie Chaplin, continuing^his long tradition of laughing 
at the world’s foibles and phoneys, turns his attention to a not-too-mythical character 
railed Hynkyl 


Does "The Great Dictator” sound a 
new note in Charlie’s devastating 
comedy? Chaplin laughs at the idea 
...and here’s why! 


IN A WORLD of flux and in- 
1 stability, there is something 
more than moderately reassuring 
in the inexhaustible popularity of 
Charlie Chaplin. Modes of living 
may change, monarchies and gov¬ 
ernments crumble, moral values 
be revised, but Charlie Chaplin— 
the universal little guy in the 
baggy trousers and the trick shoes 
—goes on, ageless, timeless. 

Chaplin made his first film in 
1913. Since then there have been 
two major wars, a half dozen 
minor ones, and a host of changes, 
spiritual and material. But none 
of these has affected either Chap- 


The amazing thing about Chap¬ 
lin is his adaptability. Chaplin 
was a pioneer in motion pictures, 
and today he is still a pioneer. 
Almost more amazing than this is 
the fact that he has accomplished 
this feat without basically chang¬ 
ing his theory or practice of 
humor one whit in the passing 
jears. The Chaplin conception of 
humor is as basic as the concep¬ 
tion of humor itself. It need not 
and could not be changed. 

Critics have claimed that in 
“The Great Dictator,” his new 
picture (his first in four years) 
Chaplin has changed his style, his 


constructed some of the most lav¬ 
ish and elaborate sets ever seen 
in a motion picture, props even 
more ingenious and expensive 
than those which were featured 
in “Modern Times.” One cannon, 
for example, built for the war 
scenes, is 100 feet long, and its 
construction cost was $15,000. 


Chaplin’s funny and biting por¬ 
trait of the dictator Hynkel 
haranguing a microphone, is al¬ 
ready well known through photo¬ 
graphs which have been printed 
m magazines and newspapers. 
Needless to say, the humor is ten¬ 
fold heightened in the picture it¬ 
self, with the added benefits of 
motion and Chaplin’s nonsense 
gutturals. 

“The Great Dictator” is Chap¬ 
lin’s first picture in four years. 
And it is definitely not his last. 
But it may very well prove to be 
his masterpiece. 


Above, "Easy Street,” Chaplin’s epic of 
the life of a cop on a tough heat. Left, 
a giddy moment from "The Rink” 

“City Lights” he satirized the mo¬ 
rality of a metropolis; in “Modern 
Times” he satirized industry. 

In “The Great Dictator” he 
satirizes dictators. And he is as 
funny, in the process, as he ever 
was in the most politically in¬ 
nocuous of his short comedies! 

Charlie has been, and remains, 
court jester to the empirical fol¬ 
lies of his age. Clad in baggy 
pants and funny shoes in place sufficient p£ 
of the traditional cap and bells, modern woi 
Chaplin has been no less a clown Up until ncu 
to the world than the ancient fool been confer 
was to his personal monarch. Like been more 
the jester he has dared to mock versal expri 
and ridicule his master; like the of pantomin 
jester his nonsense has often been of the gibbe 
wisdom; like the jester he has “Modern Ti 
hidden a caustic, intelligent mind had never 1 
beneath his clown’s motley. And the screen. ’ 
like the jester his principal duty ther complic 


Europe which is a good deal more 
truth than poetry. In Ring Num¬ 
ber Three there is the finest sup¬ 
porting cast he has ever assem- 
interspersed with nonsense-sound bled for one of his pictures: Paul- 
that derives as much from Lewis ette Goddard, Reginald Gardiner, 
Carroll as it does from modern Henry Daniell, Eddie Gribbon, 
double-talk. Hank Mann, Carter de Haven and 

“The Great Dictator” has been the irrepressible Signor Jack 
referred to as a three-ring circus. Oakie, putting the spurs to a 
In Ring Number One there is character named Napaloni, rival 
Chaplin the little tramp, the wist- dictator to Hynkel. 
ful and unpredictable zany. In Among other things, “The 
Ring Number Two there is Chap- Great Dictator” is Chaplin’s per- 
lin the Dictator, a comic synthesis sonal contribution to the cause 
of the madmen who control of democracy. It is his own special 


There is a single camera truck 
shot in which the camera travels 
425 feet—the longest such gambit 
ever recorded on the screen. These 
are merely examples. The same 
thoroughness and generous dis¬ 
play prevailed for the whole of 
the picture. 

But, despite everything, the es¬ 
sential genius of Charlie Chap¬ 
lin’s humor is centralized in his 
complete and absolute mastery of 
the art of pantomime. His famous 
Oceana Roll in “The Gold Rush” 
will never be forgotten; nor will 
such masterpieces as his poetic 


lin or his adulating audience all 
over the world. The reason is sim¬ 
ple; whatever else has changed, 
the basis of humor has remained 
constant. Chaplin has been called 
a genius, and maybe he is—he 
hasn’t taken the trouble to deny 
the charge—but more important 
than that, he is funny—devastat- 
ingly funny. He is as funny now 
as he was twenty-seven years ago, 
and as funny as his pictures will 
be one hundred and twenty seven 
years from now. 


approach. Chaplin, they claim, 
has now become a satirist. Chap¬ 
lin himself laughs at this apprais¬ 
al. His style, his approach, has 
always been confined to one thing 
—making people laugh. It still is. 
As for the charge that he has be¬ 
come a satirist, what else has he 
ever been? In “The Rink” he 
satirized fancy skaters; in “The 
Rounders” he satirized playboys; 
in “Easy Street” he satirized the 
police; in “Shoulder Arms” he 
satirized war and soldiers; in 


"The Pilgrim” was one of 
Chaplin’s early full-length 
comedies — and one of his 
funniest 


Chaplin is news-bigger news than anything that has happened in the entertainment world in a long time! Here's a full-page story on Chaplin 
that carries enormous charm and appeal, tremendous punch and will find a universal response in the hearts of newspaper readers of all ages. 
Your local newspaper will welcome it; see that it is run in advance of your showing! Order the 8-column Mat direct from United Artists Exploi¬ 
tation Dept., 729-7th Ave., New York. Price, $1.20. 











CHARLIE CHAPLIN TALK) ! 




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For a show-selling story break in thefeature page or weekend section of your newspaper, order ^ 
this newsy, exciting half-page mat direct from United Artists Exploitation Dept. Price, $1.20. 


-a -3 

S *C 







Charlie Chaplin's great new comedy deserves the best in 
publicity art—and that's just what you have in these expert car¬ 
toons by the renowned caricaturist, Herschfeld. Famous for his 
caricatures of celebrities which appear regularly in metropolitan 
newspapers and magazines, Herschfeld here has caught the 
spirit and flavor of Chaplin's new masterpiece with hilarious 
effect. These drawings, which are of a standard of excellence 
usually accessible only to the biggest publications, are available 
to you for planting in your local newspaper for the mere cost of 
the mats. Get them set for some beautiful ticket-selling breaks! 


Charlie tangles with a super- 
colossal siege gun in this hilar¬ 
ious sketch illustrating one of 
the early sequences of the pic¬ 
ture. Available on 2-column 
Mat No. 57B — 30c (Cut — 50c); 
3-column Mat No. 58B — 45c 
( Cut — 75c). 




Herschfeld portrays Chaplin in a soulful dancing mood as 
he comes to grips with the buxom wife of Napaloni. Order 
this drawing on 2-column Mat No. 60S — 30c (Cut — 50c). 


The Great Dictator of Tomania squares off to a battery of 
mikes , in this eloquent caricature. Ask for 2-column Mat No. 
55B — 30c (Cut — 50c); or 3-column Mat No. 56C — 45c 
( Cut — 75c ). 


In this idyllic little scene the 
beloved Charlie of tradition , 
complete with derby , cane and 
big shoes , takes his sweetheart 
for a stroll. Order this delight¬ 
ful Herschfeld sketch on 2- 
column Mat No. 59B — 30c (Cut 
— 50c ). 



Dictators Hynkel and Napaloni ride triumphantly through the streets while the 
populace cheers and takes it on the chin. Order 2-column Mat No. 53B — 30c 
(Cut — 50c); or 3-column Mat No. 54C — 45c (Cut — 75c). 



Page Fifteen 


























Order Chaplin 
“News Flashes” 
and “Talky” Cards 
from 

SKILPRINT 

IDEAS 

220 W. 19th Street 
New York City 



“Talky” Cards Make 
Charlie Talk! 

Here's a "class" novelty that's 
not only eye-catching to look at, but 
draws attention because it does some¬ 
thing. These Chaplin "Talky" cards, 
actual size of which is 6" x 7", crease 
down the center, and when folded 
back and forth rapidly on the crease 
Charlie's mouth moves as if he were 
delivering a speech! 

Grownups will be amused, kids 
will be delighted with the working of 
this ingenious gadget. Order them 
for town-wide distribution. Price, in¬ 
cluding imprint on back of card 
(shown folded at left): 1M—$25; 
2500—$50; 500—$15.00. 



Chaplin “News Flashes” 
Tell Your Story 

A novelty that's really novel 
—a miniature newspaper inserted 
through a slit under Charlie's arm 
that flashes a show-selling message 
on "The Great Dictator" in a tricky, 
amusing way! They won't be able to 
resist the temptation to pull out the 
little paper and read it—and to show 
this ingenious novelty gag to their 
friends! "Chaplin News Flashes" are 
made on durable stock, in 6" x 3 Vi" 
size—ready for mailing or hand dis¬ 
tribution. Theatre imprint furnished 
on the miniature newspaper. Price, 
with imprint: 1 M—$20.00; 2500— 
$37.50; 5M—$65.00; 500—$12.50. 




Felt Derbies For 
Lapel Ornament 

Poopee-Snoopee Novelty Co., specialists in min¬ 
iature hats for lapel wear, are furnishing these little 
Chaplin felt derbies with the name of the star and 
picture title plainly legible in reverse lettering on 
the hatband. Derbies are made of genuine felt, and 
will stand long wear. Width of the brim overall is 
2!/2"; crown is 1" high. Wearers of these engaging 
novelties have been stopped on the street by fascin¬ 
ated strangers. Amusing and piquant, they're the 
best kind of teaser selling for your show. Each hat 
furnished with a small gold-finish safety pin. Price, 
$3.50 per hundred. 

Order direct from 
POOPEE SNOOPEE, Inc. 

191 Seventh Ave. New York City 


m 


MOVIE FLIP BOOKS 

A flash movie sequence of Charlie Chaplin with a wow finish— 
that's what the kids will get when they cut out the eight perforated j| 
frames of this card and staple them together in correct order as shown 
by the numbers. An ideal inexpensive kid novelty that gives them 
action and show-selling, with something to keep, laugh at, and show 
around. Actual size is 6 Vi" x 7" overall. Distribute them through 
schools, kid organizations, and by direct giveaway. Prices, including 
theatre imprint and playdate: 1 M—$5.25; 2M—$5.00 per M; 3M— 
$4.75 per M (postage additional). 


COMIC STRIP BLOTTER 


Novelty blotters are advertising mediums that can give sustained 
selling; here's one composed of actual stills from "The Great Dictator," y 
with amusing balloons that end up with a natural, unforced plug for 
your great comedy show. Priced low enough for wide distribution, they 
make a show-selling adjunct that the youngsters will scramble for. 
Actual size of the blotter is 2Vi' 7 x OVi", with comic strip side printed 
on good coated stock. Prices: $5.25 per M; 2M—$5.00 per M; 3M— 
$4.75 per M; 500—$3.50 (postage additional). Illustrated below. 


Order Flip Books 
and Blotters from 
SCENE-MARK COMPANY 
221 W. 41st Street 
New York City 



YOU DANCE 
DIVINELY 
BUT WHY 
DON'T YOU 
L. SPEAK? A 


AREN'T YOU 
EVER GOING 
TO TALK. £ 
CHARLIE t M 


[OH MR CHAPLIN 
I'M SO 

i THU-RILLED 


/ YES! JUST 
N WAIT TILL YOU I 
■ HEAR ME IN I 
f ‘THE ’ 
GREAT DICTATOR* 


GOOSE STEP GLIDE 


CHARLIE CHAPLIN TALKS in " THE GREAT DICTATOR 


> 


Fage Sixteen 











































V) 




MAGIC “MYSTO-AD” 

Perfect for getting across ip teaser fashion the dual character of Chaplin's talking role 
in "The Great Dictator," this double-barrelled novelty combines the appeal of mystery as to 
how it works, and the advantage of a strong promotional message for your show. Illustrated 
at left (in reduced size) is the card before it is transformed; at right is the same card after 
being rubbed with damp cloth or cotton first applied to the "mystic spot." This one will 
excite—and sell—fans of all ages. Actual size is 4Vs" x 5 ] A", printed on heavy paper. 
Prices, including imprint (cash with order) : 1M—$4.00; 2M—7.00; 3M—10.00; 4M— 
13.00; 5M—15.00; 25M—2.50 per M. Allow two weeks for production. Order direct from 

PARK PRINTING CO. 

817 Park Avenue 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Door and Auto 
Hanger 

A staple novelty that takes 
on new show-selling import¬ 
ance when it presents them 
with a goofy salute from the 
gaga Great Dictator. Get 
them up on apartment door¬ 
knobs, street doors, office 
and car doors all over. Hole 
and slit at top permit these 
hangers to be placed on any 
style door or knob. Size 1 1" 
high, printed on attractively 
colored cardboard. Prices, 
with theatre imprint: 500— 
$4.50; 1M—6.00; 5M— 

5.50 per M; 10M—5.00 
per M. 


Order these items from 
ECONOMY NOVELTY CO. 
225 W. 39th Street 
New York City 


You'll want to have plenty of Chaplin 
imitators strutting around your town; and 
an indispensable part of their equipment 
is a Charlie Chaplin cane. These canes 
suggest Charlie Chaplin and sell the ap¬ 
peal of your show at a glance. Each one 
has a small cardboard pennant with bill¬ 
ing and your theatre imprint. Prices: 
100—$5.00; 250—10.00; 500—17.50; 
1000—30.00. Minimum order, 20 canes 
at 5c each. 



Cardboard Masks 

This attractive Charlie Chaplin mask in two colors 
is one of your important exploitation items for imper¬ 
sonation stunts, Charlie Chaplin contests, parades, or 
general giveaway. Made of durable cardboard, they 
are priced inexpensively enough for round-town dis¬ 
tribution. Kids love to impersonate Chaplin; use these 
masks and encourage Chaplin imitations wherever 
youngsters get together. Masks are made of durable 
cardboard, 9" x 11" overall, die cut all around with 
holes for eyes and slits for nose and mouth. Strings 
furnished ready for inserting. Prices, including theatre 
imprint: 1M—$12.50; 3M—$12.00 per M; 5M— 
$11.50 per M; 500—$7.50; 250—$4.50. Order 
direct from ECONOMY NOVELTY CO., 225 W. 39th 
Street, New York. 



Cloth Masks 

For your more important Chaplin impersonation 
stunts, such as a Chaplin imitation contest on your 
stage, a street bally or parade, here are good quality 
cloth masks, moulded to fit children, airbrushed in 
color. Eyes, nose and mouth have small openings; 
elastic is fastened at both sides. Made to cover the 
full face, they should be worn with Chaplin derbies 
(see special Chaplin derbies on page 24). Prices: 10 
for $1.00; 25—$2.00; 55—$4.00; 100—$6.50. 


Jig Saw Puzzle in Envelope 



514" x 7" Jig Saw Puzzle 


Give the jigsaw puzzle fad 
a new impetus by introduc¬ 
ing this attractive and brain¬ 
tickling Chaplin puzzle. The 
popular, amusing photo of 
The Great Dictator looking 
for new worlds to conquer is 
die-cut as shown here, into 
sections that make a puzzle 
neither too easy nor too diffi¬ 
cult for solution. Spread 
them broadcast in your town 
and get local families work¬ 
ing out the jigsaw and re¬ 
ceiving the ticket-selling 
message. Puzzle is made 
of heavy cardboard, in 
two colors, furnished com¬ 
plete in open-end envelope 
which carries selling copy 
and your theatre imprint. 
Prices, including imprint: 
1M—$18.50; 3M—18.00 

per M; 5M—17.50 per M; 
500—10.00; 250—6.00. 
Order direct from Economy 
Novelty Co., 225 W. 39th 
Street, New York. 


i ss | 



These flashy two-color double- 
cross badges, worn on coat lapels, 
blouses and dresses of local kids, 
will start a town-sweeping fad. 
The double-cross insignia, with 
the picture title displayed, gets 
across the idea of your show in¬ 
stantly, and there's space for a 
legible theatre imprint. Badges 
are made in two colors, with red 
lettering on a black background, 
of thick fibre board stock equipped 
with patent pin feature. Prices: 
500—$9.50; 1M—16.50; 3M— 
15.50 per M; 5M—15.00 per M. 


S^rm^anc/i 



Another "must" item in your exploitation equip¬ 
ment is this cardboard mustache, to go with the derby 
and cane in any Chaplin impersonation stunts you are 
promoting. Die-cut to the exact shape and size of 
Charlie's own mustache, the two prongs will fit securely 
in any nose and hold firmly in place. Foster that 
"making-like-Chaplin" craze by distributing them 
widely. Printed on durable cardboard, with star name 
and picture title on reverse side. Price, $5.00 per M. 


List among your popular juvenile- 
distribution items these teaser arm- 
bands, with double-cross emblem and 
picture title arranged so that either 
the insignia or the title can be worn 
on the outside of the arm. Kids will 
want to "join" this gag order of the 
double-cross by wearing them and 
thus publicizing your show. Also a 
natural for your ushers. Made of 
heavy paper, with printing on colored 
stock. Price, $7.75 per M. 

Order these items from 

M. M. RODBELL CO., 280 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK 



/T\ THE 

CV GREAT DICTATOR 


Page Seventeen 






















































TWO DICTATORS WITH 
AN AXIS TO GRIND 
AND A REFEREE 


"The Great Dictator’’^Speaks, 
And So Does Charlie Chaplin 



“The Great Dictator” is Charlie Chaplin's greatest and funniest comedy, and in this scene he is seen 
with Henry Daniel! and Jack Oakie in one of his more serious moods. This new Chaplin production* 
which United Artists is releasing, will start a run at the . .Theatre on . 


2 C—Three Col. Scene (Mat .45; Cut .75) 


A Slight Error 
In “Dictators” 


What would you do if you had 
just escaped from a concentration 
camp, were mistaken for a suddenly 
victorious dictator—the same who 
had incarcerated you—and despite 
all protestations, were acknowl¬ 
edged the sole dictator of the very 
country you were trying to escape 
from? 

That is but one of the hilarious 
situations Charlie Chaplin finds 
himself in in his new film, “The 
Great Dictator,” which will be re¬ 
leased by United Artists at the 
.Theatre on.. 

In this comedy satirizing world 
affairs, Charlie is seen in a role 
other than his famous Tramp for 
the first time. Not only is the film 
novel in that respect, but Charlie 
is seen for the first time in an all- 
talking film—in dual roles—writ¬ 
ten, directed and produced by him¬ 
self. 



As “The Great Dictator,” 
Charlie Chaplin loves babies. 

11 A^—Une Col. Scene 
(Mat .15; Cut .25) 


Everybody Is Cheering 
Chaplin ’sNewComedy 

(Advance Feature) 

Charlie Chaplin is back. 

After two years of now-you-see-him-now-you-don’t and an incredible 
confusion of rumors as to whether he would make “The Great Dictator” 
or not make it, and then, having made it, whether it had to be remade, 
and then, whether it would ever be publicly shown, the news is that 
“The Great Dictator,” the first Charlie Chaplin comedy since “Modern 
Times,” will open at the .Theatre on. 

Not only that, there are the following foot-notes; that it was com¬ 
pleted in 171 days of shooting time, which is reasonable enough when 
it is considered that Chaplin writes the story and the dialogue, directs 
the story, plays a dual role in the picture, edits it and scores the music. 

It cost in the neighborhood of more than $2,000,000. That it is 
the most ambitious and the most expensive production that Chaplin has 
ever attempted is less important than the fact that it involves the 
little clown in artistic responsibilities and caricature that he has never 
before attempted. 

For, in “The Great Dictator,” Chaplin is seen not only as the little 
tramp with the derby, the cane and the awkwardly fitting shoes, but in 
another role as well—that of a mighty dictator of a war-mad power. 
There are two stories that converge—the story of the little barber from 
the ghetto, and the story of the palace. 

Notwithstanding the fact that Charlie has the omnipresence of a 
dual role, the cast that supports him in “The Grea Dictator” is larger 
by far and far more important than in “Modern Times,” “City Lights” 
or any of the earlier Chaplin comedy masterpieces. Paulette Goddard, 
who has achieved a stardom of her own since she was first introduced 
in a Chaplin comedy, again is his leading lady, and it is she with whom 
he plays the poignant romance of the story. Jack Oakie is seen and 
heard in the connivings of the rival dictator, Napaloni. Reginald 
Gardiner, well remembered on Broadway as the man who made wall¬ 
paper talk, is Schultz, aide to the dictator 

And Chaplin talks. How? His first speech in the picture has been 
given a dramatic frame; it is an event. He is still the mild and 
pathetic little man with the doe eyes. His speech is exactly what you 
would expect as the little clown of screen history. But as the mad 
dictator, he thunders and roars, rants and screams into a dozen wither¬ 
ing michophones in an undecipherable guttural. 

Chaplin, breaking the silence that habitually enshrouds the pro¬ 
duction of his pictures, points out that notwithstanding any burlesque 
of history and world events that might be found in “The Great Dicta¬ 
tor,” no change in the story was necessitated by those events. The 
story on the screen is as the little comedian first conceived it, without 
revision. 


Decision To Talk Required Many 
Preparations; Comedian Has 
Excellent Speaking Voice 


(Advance Reader) 

It will be very amusing to watch the discomfiture on many 
faces when Charlie Chaplin speaks on the screen for the first 
time as evidenced in “The Great Dictator,” which United 

Artists is bringing to the.Theatre on .. 

The nearest he has ever come to speech in a picture was 

the “Titina” number -in “Modern---- 


Times” in which he sang a song 
in a sort of gibberish. 

For many years Charlie has been 
so identified with the pantomimic 
role of “the little tramp,” a great 
number of people came to the con¬ 
clusion he couldn’t speak, forget¬ 
ting that prior to his entrance into 
moving pictures in 1913, Charlie 
was a recognized actor—not only 
with the Karno Repertoire Com¬ 
pany with which he came to the 
United States, but had played in 
support of such well known stars 
as William Gillette, Irene Van¬ 
brugh and many others. 

Spoke for NRA 

When President Roosevelt in¬ 
augurated the N.R.A., some years 
ago Charlie made a radio broadcast 
in its favor. There were many skep¬ 
tics who, because they couldn’t see 
him, went so far as to say that 
though Charlie was announced as 
the speaker, they didn’t believe it 
was really his voice they heard. 

Now, in “The Great Dictator,” 
they can see as well as hear, and 
many will marvel that he stayed 
silent for so many years. As “the 
little tramp” Charlie, as well as 
most of his followers, believed he 
should have no voice. He was uni¬ 
versally known and understood in 
pantomime much as the mythical 
characters of Santa Claus and 
other people created solely from 
imagination are known and under¬ 
stood. In “The Great Dictator,” he 
deviates only slightly in his inter¬ 
pretation of his character—wears 
the same clothes, affects the same 
inimitable mannerisms that have 
made Charlie famous. 

But the problem presented itself 
—how was he to break his silence 
for the first time? For each person 
in a Chaplin audience had his own 
interpretation of a voice the little 
man would use. The transition 
would have to be gradual — and 
most important of all — for a 
reason. 

How Charlie bridged this barrier 
is only another tribute to his amaz¬ 
ing ingenuity, and is one of the 


basic motives for the story. And 
HOW this is done is one of the 
many surprises waiting for all the 
Chaplin fans who so eagerly look 
forward to his pictures. 


Charlie Gave 
A “Cat” Party 


It was literally a field day for 
cats on the Charlie Chaplin comedy, 
“The Great Dictator,” coming to 

the . Theatre on . 

through United Artists release. 

Around the middle of one after¬ 
noon while shooting on the Ghetto 
street, Charlie called to his assis¬ 
tant, Dan James. 

“I have an idea. Get me forty or 
fifty cats.” 

On a movie set one must be pre¬ 
pared for any emergency so a re¬ 
quest such as the above is con¬ 
sidered part of the outline of a nor¬ 
mal picture day. 

Within half an hour after Char¬ 
lie had asked for the felines, a 
truck came in with boxes and crates 
of all sizes and shapes, containing 
a most varied assortment of cats— 
from the pedigreed Persian and 
Siamese to the ordinary “alley” 
kind. 

After the scene was shot—not 
without difficulty, for directing five 
hundred extras is an easy task com¬ 
pared to such a menagerie, Charlie 
called, “Now that the ‘actors’ are 
finished—hamburger, fish and milk 
for all—and all they can eat!” 

And did those cats “fall to.” 

One of the extras on the side¬ 
lines was heard to chuckle, “If 
those cats could only talk! Can you 
imagine them reporting to work at 
another studio and boasting, ‘We 
worked at Chaplin’s the other day 
and he not only paid us, but threw 
a party for us as well’.” 



The pretty lady is Paulette Goddard, the gentleman curling her hair 
is Charlie Chaplin, and the scene is unreeled in “The Great Dictator,” 
Charlie's funniest comedy, which is now showing at the. .... Theatre. 

9 B—Two Col. Scene ( Mat .30; Cut .50) 


Page Eighteen 











































Chaplin Becomes “The Great Dictator” 

In The Funniest Comedy Of His Career 


How One Man 
Is a Studio 
By Himself 

“The Great Dictator” is the title 
of Charlie Chaplin’s latest comedy, 
but the title might well be applied 
Ao the man, himself. 

For Chaplin is all things and 
everything to all of his pictures. 
He is producer, author, star, com- 
, poser, designer, supervisor, editor 
and two or twenty other things. 
Finally, he produces his pictures in 
his own studio with his own money. 

From the inception of the origi¬ 
nal idea, through the writing, film¬ 
ing, cutting and final scoring of the 
picture, it’s all Chaplin. True, he 
has expert technicians and an able 
staff, but that’s the way the most 
famous comedian in the world 
works. 

^ Comedy is serious business to 
Charlie Chaplin. It is something of 
an understatement to say that it’s 
a big business when it is realized 
that Chaplin spent $2,000,000 to 
make “The Great Dictator,” which 
is slated for its premiere at the 
. Theatre on. 

Very few men approach their 
jobs with the enthusiasm that 
Charlie does—or with the patience. 
For months he will mull over an 
idea. Then comes the day that he 
starts making longhand notes on 
the big yellow pads that constantly 
surround him. Soon a secretary is 
called in and Charlie really goes 
to work. 

No Attention to Time 

ffe arrives at the studio promptly 
each morning at nine. Other than 
that, he pays no attention to time. 
The actual putting of the story on 
paper is usually a matter of 
months. He plans his “business” 
and “gags” down to the minutest 
detail before they are incorporated 
into the script. When the scenario 
is nearly complete, an art director 
is called in. Chaplin makes the 
rough sketches himself and per- 
’■ sonally supervises the building of 
the sets. 

On the set, although Charlie has 
assistants, he directs each actor, 
as well as himself. As a matter of 
fact, Chaplin is the only big star 
who has successfully directed him¬ 
self. 

As the picture progresses, Char¬ 
lie visits the cutting room at the 
completion of each sequence. Here 
he carefully examines every foot 
of film and assembles it with the 
aid of his cutter. When the picture 
is ready for scoring, another Chap¬ 
lin talent is revealed; for Charlie 
writes the major part of the music. 

Yes, Charlie Chaplin IS “The 
Great Dictator,” but surely a be¬ 
nevolent one and certainly the most 



Charlie Chaplin, the world’s 
greatest comedian. 

15A —One Col. Head 
(Mat .15; Cut .25) 



The long awaited new Charlie Chaplin comedy brings beloved Charlie back to the screen as “The Great 
Dictator,” and in this scene he gives his own laugh-filled version of what a radio broadcast should 
be. This new comedy will be released through United Artists at the.Theatre on.. 

1C —Three Col. Scene (Mat .45; Cut .75) 


CHARLES CHAPLIN 

With 

Paulette Goddard 

in 

THE GREAT DICTATOR" 

Written and Directed 
by 

CHARLES CHAPLIN 
Released through United Artists 


THE CAST 


People of the Palace 


Hynkel, Dictator of Tomania.Charles Chaplin 

Napaloni, Dictator of Bacteria.Jack Oakie 

Schultz ..Reginald Gardiner 

Garbitsch .Henry Daniell 

Herring.Billy Gilbert 

Madame Napaloni.Grace Hayle 

Bacterian Ambassador.Carter de Haven 


People of the Ghetto 


A Jewish Barber 

Hannah . 

Mr. Jaeckel . . . 
Mrs. Jaeckel . . 

Mr. Mann. 

Mr. Agar. 


. . . Charles Chaplin 
. Paulette Goddard 
Maurice Moscovich 

.Emma Dunn 

. . . Bernard Gorcev 
.Paul Weigel 


TECHNICAL STAFF 


SHORTS 


AUTOGRAPHS 

Paulette Goddard, the radiantly 
beautiful actress who is appearing 
as leading lady opposite Charlie 
Chaplin in his latest comedy, “The 

Great Dictator,” at the . 

Theatre, has a hobby of collecting 
autographs of world-famous 
authors. In her library, she has 
personally inscribed books from 
John Steinbeck, Will Durant, H. G. 
Wells, Edna St. Vincent Millay, 
Max Miller and Sinclair Lewis. 

FAME * 

A life-sized portrait of Maurice 
Moscovich who plays the prominent 
role of “Mr. Jaeckel” in Charlie 
Chaplin’s latest comedy, “The 
Great Dictator,” which is due for 
its premiere at the. Thea¬ 
tre on ., hangs in the Na¬ 

tional Museum in Holland. The 
picture presents Mr. Moscovich in 
his famous role of “Shylock.” 

• 

GHETTO SCENE 

The first scenes shot in the new¬ 
est Charlie Chaplin comedy, “The 

Great Dictator,” coming on . 

to the . Theatre, were on 

a Ghetto Street. Crowds of people 
sweltered in the heat of Califor¬ 
nia’s hottest day in six years for 
this scene until Charlie came out 
on the set and ordered dance music. 
The torrid atmosphere was for¬ 
gotten as groups got to their feet 
and went into a dance, led by the 
inimitable Charlie himself. 


Musical Direction 
Assistant Directors 


Directors of Photography 

Art Director 
Film Editor 
Sound . 


.Meredith Willson 

.Dan James 
Wheeler Dryden 
Bob Meltzer 
Karl Struss A. S. C. 

Roland Totheroh O.A.T.S.E. 

Russell Spencer 
Willard Nico 


SWEATERS 

In spite of the fact that she ap¬ 
peared in practically every scene 
each day she worked, Paulette God¬ 
dard, Charlie Chaplin’s lovely lead¬ 
ing lady in “The Great Dictator,” 
now at the.Theatre, man¬ 

aged to knit a sweater for both 
herself and Charlie, as well as 
several for friends, during her run 
on the picture. 


J. 


Percy Townsend 
Glenn Rominger 


Paulette Glad 
To “Be Home” 
On Chaplin Lot 

What is Paulette Goddard really 
like? So many people ask that ques¬ 
tion for the simple reason that 
Paulette to interviewers presents 
somewhat of an enigma. And that 
merely because she doesn’t choose 
to discuss her personal life and 
problems. 

The first thing that impresses one 
about Paulette is her directness, 
simplicity and downright honesty. 
Her first words when she came 
back to the Chaplin studio to ap¬ 
pear as Charlie’s leading lady in 
“The Great Dictator,” were, “Gosh, 
but it’s nice to be home again.” 
And she meant it. For success has 
turned her head not a whit. 

Off the screen Paulette prefers 
sports clothes and slacks, and with 
that fresh-scrubbed look that every¬ 
one comments on, she appears not 
a day over eighteen. She wears 
very little make-up, and her skin 
is a rich, golden tan, for Paulette 
is a devotee of the outdoors, ex¬ 
celling in golf, tennis, skiing, skat¬ 
ing, horseback riding and swim¬ 
ming. 

Paulette Is Witty 

She has no so-called “small talk.” 
Extremely intelligent with a ready 
wit, everything she says means 
something. On the set between 
scenes, as a rule, she prefers to sit 
off to the side, either knitting or 
reading. 

But that doesn’t mean she’s in 
any way superior. As a matter of 
fact, during the making of “The 
Great Dictator,” which is slated for 
its premiere at the.Thea¬ 
tre on , Paulette in¬ 

augurated a golf team, sponsoring 
and playing in two tournaments in 
which everyone at the studio from 
electricians, prop men, “grips,” 
actors and technicians participated. 



Paulette Goddard in 
“The Great Dictator,” 

12 A—One Col. Head 
(Mat .15; Cut .25) 


Unlike most stars, she has no 
dressing room on the set—merely 
a make-up table with the conven¬ 
tional lights and chair. She re¬ 
quires no waiting on, and her maid 
is more often than not conspicuous 
by her absence. 

Rather than craving attention, 
she utterly dislikes flattery or un¬ 
due attentions. Paulette wants to 
be liked for herself—not for the 
star billing she rates. 

Anyone who has seen Paulette 
before the cameras is inevitably 
moved to admiration for her quick 
understanding, her patience and 
her wonderful sense of humor. 


Page Nineteen 
































































A Fast Exit 
Indicated 
For Two 


Charlie Chaplin’s Press Agent 
Has Big Job Suppressing News 


The Dictator 
Is Looking 
Pensive 





Charlie Interested 
In His Pictures, 
Not Himself 


Charlie Chaplin — perhaps the 
most publicized person the amuse¬ 
ment world has ever known — 
maintains a press department, of 
course. But unlike other studios, 
instead of a staff, it is manned by 
one person. And that person’s chief 
job is to suppress publicity rather 
than further it. 

For Charlie, whose latest comedy, 
“The Great Dictator,” comes to 

the . Theatre on ., 

believes that fundamentally the 
public is interested in a star for but 
one reason—his pictures. If they 
aren’t good, he maintains, all the 
publicity in the world means 
nothing. And to that end, his 
studios concentrate not on Charlie 
—what he thinks, eats, wears, likes 
or dislikes — but the movies he 
makes—and only when in produc¬ 
tion. Then, and then only, does 
news come from his publicity offices. 

It is a fact that no star in the 
business has “passed up” more 
space than Chaplin. On the first 
day’s shooting on the present pic¬ 
ture, his press department had to 
turn down single and double page 
spreads in five nationally known 
magazines, a rotogravure in the 
largest New York newspaper, a 
feature story in a Sunday Los 
Angeles syndicated magazine sec¬ 
tion with a circulation of over 
twenty million readers, not to men¬ 
tion exclusive picture spreads in 
three leading national pictorial 
magazines. 

Not that Charlie under-rates the 
value of the press. But acting in 
the triple capacity of producer- 
director-star, as well as author of 
all his productions, he necessarily 
is occupied months on his pictures. 
He believes that to surfeit the pub¬ 
lic with information so far in ad¬ 
vance is waste—that people tire 
of reading about something they 
won’t see for a long time. 

His publicity department, how¬ 
ever, whether in production or not, 
is always flooded with mail, phone 
calls and people from all walks of 
life—all wanting news or some¬ 
thing of Charlie. 


This new picture of Charlie Chaplin, the world’s greatest comedian, 
shows him as “The Great Dictator,” the film comedy which he produced 
and directed himself. It will be released by United Artists at the 
.Theatre on. 

5 B—Two Col. Scene (Mat .30; Cut .50) 


Charlie Chaplin’s new comedy, “The Great Dictator,” which is now 

playing an engagement at the.Theatre, teams the great 

comedian with lovely Paulette Goddard, and in this scene they are 
obviously on the run. 

8 B—Two Col. Scene (Mat .30; Cut .50) 


Paulette Goddard and Charlie Chaplin are taking a walk, but there’s 
more than meets the eye in this exciting scene from “The Great 
Dictator,” Chaplin’s new and greatest comedy which is now on view 
at the . Theatre. 

7 B—Two Col. Scene (Mat .30; Cut .50) 


Kids Get Big Surprise 
As Glass Becomes Candy 


There may be a lot of youngsters in Los Angeles who for 
divers reasons won’t be able to see Charlie Chaplin in his new 
comedy, “The Great Dictator,” now playing an engagement 
at the Theatre, but nevertheless they will remember 

Charlie for a long time. 


One of the strange jobs connect¬ 
ed with picture making is the 
manufacture of synthetic glass— 
panes for windows, windshields 
for cars, breakaway dishes and 
the like. And a fact not generally 
known is that practically all the 
shatterable glass used in scenes 
where it has to be broken is candy. 
And the purest—made from the 
finest of cane sugars. 

Exactly one ton was ordered in 
case lots for some scenes in the 
new Chaplin picture. But a last 
minute change ruled the scenes 
out, and someone then thought of 
the enormous supply of candy glass 
on hand. 

Someone suggested that the 
candy be sent to various local or¬ 
phanages. It immediately met with 
Charlie’s approval, and the day 
before Thanksgiving a truck went 
out from the studio, depositing 
enough at five local Los Angeles or¬ 
phanages to insure all the children 
plenty of sweets to top off their 
turkey dinners. 

So though these youngsters may 
not actually see Charlie’s newest 
film, he has earned himself a warm 
spot in their hearts through his 
kindly gesture. 


GOOD BUSINESS 


In addition to her film career, 
Paulette Goddard, the flashing 
brunette actress, is an astute busi¬ 
ness woman, with important in¬ 
terests in one of the best known 
beauty shops in Hollywood as well 
as in an exclusive skiing club now 
being constructed near Reno, Ne¬ 
vada. Paulette, of course, is Charlie 
Chaplin’s leading lady in the co¬ 
median’s latest film production, 
“The Great Dictator,” which is 
slated for its premiere at the 

Theatre on.through United 

Artists release. The comedy also 
features Jack Oakie. 


Henry Daniell 
Famous Actor 


“Garbitsch,” chief aide to Charlie 
Chaplin, “The Great Dictator,” is 
the role played by Henry Daniell 
one of the screen’s outstanding 
character actors. Born in London, 
March 5, 1894, Daniell had an 
enviable career on the stage before 
his advent into pictures. 

His first appearance was in Lon¬ 
don in the production of “Kismet” 
in 1914. Then after performances . 
in Maeterlinck’s “Monna Vanna” 
and “The Sphinx,” he joined the 
second Batt. Norfolk Regiment at 
the outbreak of the World War but 
was invalided out of the service 
in 1915. 

Resuming his stage career, he 
scored successes in both London and 
New York, beginning his film ca¬ 
reer in 1929. Brilliant characteriza¬ 
tions in such well known pictures 
as “The Awful Truth,” “Conquest” 
with Greta Garbo, “Holiday,” 
“Marie Antoinette,” “We Are Not 
Alone,” “The Sea Hawk” and 
others influenced Chaplin to selggU 
him for the role of “Garbitsch” iqT 
the noted comedian’s first all-talk¬ 
ing comedy, “The Great Dictator,” 
which will have its local premiere 
at the.Theatre on. 

“The Great Dictator” is the first 
Charlie Chaplin picture since “Mod¬ 
ern Times,” and has been eagerly 
awaited by Chaplin fans all over 
the world—for in his latest film, 
which satirizes current events, 
Chaplin not only plays a dual role, 
but he also talks. This latter fact 
should serve to stump all the ex¬ 
perts who for years concluded that 
Charlie “couldn’t talk” on tnt*^\ 
screen because he didn’t talk in his ) 
former pictures. 


Fly In The Ointment 
Slows Up Production 


The average movie goer who sits in the theatre watching 
his favorites has no idea of the many seemingly unimportant 
factors pertaining to the making of a picture. 

Take the barber shop sequence in Charlie Chaplin’s newest 


comedy, “The Great Dictator, 

Theatre on . Charlie had 

rehearsed this very important 
scene almost an entire day, and 
during the hot spell that broke 
California’s all-time heat record. 

Painstakingly he had worked out 
all the mechanics and business with 
Paulette Goddard and Maurice 
Moscovich who appeared with 
Charlie in the scene. Around four 
o’clock he gave the word to “shoot.” 

The usual call for “Quiet” came 
from the sound man—“Roll” from 
Dan James assisting Charlie in the 
directing. Moscovich started his 
long speech when the mixer (who 
works the sound control board on 
the set, regulating the quality and 
tone of the voices) gave the brief 
order, “Cut!” Charlie looked up in 
consternation. 

“A fly,” was all the mixer re¬ 
plied. 

“A fly?” Charlie repeated. 

“Yes. Come and listen for your¬ 
self.” 

Charlie and James did, and re¬ 
ported it sounded like a huge air¬ 
plane zooming around. The crew 
started to work on the elusive fly. 
Swatters and the usual remedies 
were used in profusion until at last 
the insect was cornered. 

The incident of the fly may sound 
trivial in the telling. However, it 
not only broke the actors’ mood but 
resulted in a delay in production 
while the search went on amount¬ 
ing to several hundreds of dollars. 
Just one of the strange incidents 
that go into the making of a pic¬ 
ture that the average person never 
hears or thinks of. 

“The Great Dictator,” which is 
being released through United Art¬ 
ists, also features Jack Oakie, Billy 
Gilbert, Henry Daniell and Emma 
Dunn. 

In “The Great Dictator,” in 
which Charlie returns to the screen 
for the first time since he appeared 
in “Modern Times,” the world’s 
greatest comedian not only talks 
for the first time in his brilliant 
career, but he also plays a dual 
role. This comes about through a 
series of hilarious incidents in 
which Charlie, an unsuspecting lit¬ 
tle barber, is mistaken for a great 


’ coming to the 


and powerful dictator and is 
pressed into service to his country. 

As is usual in all Chaplin pic¬ 
tures, many of the old familiar 
faces of pictures again turn up in 
“The Great Dictator.” For when¬ 
ever there was a “bit,” Charlie 
gave it to an old associate. 


Page Twenty 


















































While Chaplin Works 

Secrecy Necessary to Safeguard 
Gags and Comedy Situations; 

Most Comedians Do It 


Newspaper men—and others— 
so often ask, “Why doesn’t Chaplin 
allow visitors on his sets?” 

As a matter of fact, he does— 
but very seldom. 

Anyone familiar with the basis 
of comedy knows that it is built 
on what is called in the profession 
“gag situations.” While of course 
all good comedies must have a 
story, the pictures rely mainly on 
funny situations—some of which 
are so closely interwoven with the 
story itself as to be inseparable. 

All prominent picture comedians 
work on closed sets. Harold Lloyd 
and the Marx Brothers, in particu¬ 
lar, are adamant about this. Were 
outsiders allowed to view the pic¬ 
ture in shooting, naturally the 
situations would not only be dis¬ 
closed, thus ruining the denoue¬ 
ment, but alas! too often in Holly¬ 
wood gags are not only talked 
over, but in polite parlance, “lifted” 
—oftimes unintentionally. 

Comedy Not For Sale 

In the case of a Chaplin picture 
which by its very nature and man¬ 
ner of production with Charlie 
writing, supervising, directing and 
starring in it, takes longer, than 
other comedians’ pictures to be 
released, a funny situation that 
he may have painstakingly labored 
over for weeks can be appropriated 
by someone else, or—just as injuri¬ 
ous to the picture—be revealed. 

So on days when Charlie is doing 
“straight story” telling, visitors 
are allowed. But at other times, in 
keeping with his policy, the set is 
'dosed to all but the principals and 
staff working on his picture. 

Whether the “master of comedy,” 
as Charlie is called, is right in his 
attitude, can be seen when “The 
Great Dictator,” released by United 

Artists, comes to the . 

Theatre beginning a run on. 

In this new comedy, Charlie’s lead¬ 
ing lady is Paulette Goddard, and 
other featured players include Jack 
Oakie, Billy Gilbert, Henry Daniell, 
Maurice Moscovich and Emma 
Dunn. 

In “The Great Dictator,” Charlie 
has aimed in his own inimitable, 
subtle way to bring home to all of 
us the ridiculousness of pomp, the 
emptiness of personal ego, the il¬ 
lusions of fame. And he does it 
with the greatest weapons known to 
man—and as only Chaplin can 
wield them—laughs! 



Billy Gilbert as “Herring” in 
“The Great Dictator.” 

18A —One Col. Scene 
(Mat .15; Cut .25) 

Billy Gilbert Is 
Not Typed Now 

Billy Gilbert, playing the impor¬ 
tant role of “Herring,” one of 
Hynkel’s chief aides in Charlie 
Chaplin’s newest comedy, “The 
Great Dictator,” now showing at 

the . Theatre, is too well 

known to movie audiences to need 
much of an introduction. Born in 
Louisville, Kentucky, in 1894, of 
professional parents, practically 
his entire lifetime has been spent 
on the stage and in pictures. 

On the New York stage he was 
featured in many plays and revues 
and came to Hollywood in one of 
the latter. Hal Roach immediately 
placed him under long term con¬ 
tract where he was featured in a 
series of comedies, after which he 
signed with R.K.O. for another 
long term period. Feeling he was 
being typed, he decided to free 
lance, and for some time has been 
in great demand by all the studios. 


f 



Charlie Chaplin, the world’s most brilliant comedian, is obviously in 
trouble in this dramatic scene which is unreeled in “The Great 
Dictator,” Charlie’s great new comedy which United Artists will release 
at the.Theatre on.. 


10 B—Two Col. Scene (Mat .30; Cut .50) 


Rules as King Clown 

Charlie’s Own Three-Ring Circus 
Is Brought To The Screen 
In Full Panoply 


In the three-ring circus that Charlie Chaplin brings to the 
screen in “The Great Dictator,” there are many events that 
would constitute news in any language. 

Charlie has wandered far and looked deep into the heart for 
his laughter. Where he got the Oceana Roll in “The Gold Rush,” 
the pantomimed David and Goliath sermon in “The Pilgrim” 
or the corn-feeding ordeal in “Modern Times,” no one knows. 
They have the smell and the flavor of humankind. 

In the long catalogue of surprises and comedy inventions of 
“The Great Dictator,” Chaplin perpetrates a masterful trav- 


Sportswoman 

Paulette Goddard, the lovely 
brunette who is appearing as “Han¬ 
nah,” Charlie Chaplin’s leading 
lady in “The Great Dictator,” the 
new comedy now showng at the 

.Theatre, has a reputation 

for being a first-rate sportswoman 
that is not exaggerated. She ex¬ 
cels in swimming, tennis, golf, 
horseback riding, fishing, skiing 
and aquaplaning. Also, she is an 
expert knitter. ^ 

Famous Sons 

The late Maurice Moscovich, who 
is seen as “Mr. Jaeckel” in Charlie 
Chaplin’s latest comedy, “The 
Great Dictator,” slated to begin 

a run at the . Theatre 

on . through United 

Artists release, was survived by 
two sons who have gained fame on 
their own merits. One is Noel Madi¬ 
son, well known on the London 
stage as well as in the writing field, 
while Anton Maaskoff is a re¬ 
nowned violinist. “The Great Dic¬ 
tator” was written, produced and 
directed by Chaplin himself and is 
his biggest and funniest comedy to 
date. 

• 

Tributes to Charlie 

George Bernard Shaw has called 
Charlie Chaplin “the only genius in 
motion pictures.” And during pro¬ 
duction of Charlie’s latest and 
greatest comedy, “The Great Dicta¬ 
tor,” now at the.Theatre, 

apropos of United Artists’ having 
signed the well known Gabriel Pas¬ 
cal as a producer, sent Charlie the 
following wire: “Congratulate 
United Artists on having captured 
Pascal, the only man living, except 
yourself, who knows as much about 
filming as I do.” The last, of course, 
is part of the proverbial Shavian 
touch. Alexander Woollcott, noted 
author and commentator, has said 
of Charlie — “His like has not 
passed this way before, and we 
shall not see his like again.” 

• 

Fun for All 

On Charlie Chaplin sets there 
isn’t the hard and fast rule of “all 
work and no play,” especially when 
there are large crowds of people. 
An indefatigable worker himself, 
Charlie believes there is a psycholo¬ 
gy in getting fun out of the job 
as was evidenced during produc¬ 
tion of his latest comedy, “The 
Great Dictator,” which starts an 

engagement at the . Theatre 

on . Charlie’s formula com¬ 

bines politeness, calm and plenty 
of fun for his actors to provide the 
necessary relaxation between 
“takes.” 

Paulette's Frock 

An interesting sidelight on how 
Charlie Chaplin works was brought 
out during production of his latest 
comedy, “The Great Dictator,” now 

showing at the . Theatre. 

He was describing a dress he want¬ 
ed the wardrobe mistress to make 
for Paulette Goddard, who again 
appears as his leading lady. First 
he sketched a dress that to the 
casual observer would seem like a 
thousand and one others. Then he 
began weaving a tale in prose and 
pantomime that had his listeners 
spellbound. “It must be a work of 
art—something with thought and 
a soul behind it.” His eyes lighted 
as his enthusiasm grew. “And then 
I want a patch,” he continued, “not 
just an ordinary patch, but the 
most beautiful one in the world.” 

• 

A Star's Life 

Charlie Chaplin’s press depart¬ 
ment is always flooded with mail 
and phone calls from people from 
all walks of life. During production 
of his latest comedy, “The Great 
Dictator,” which is currently on 

view at the . Theatre, he 

was asked to endorse a popular new 
breakfast food, was asked for a 
picture of his bed to illustrate an 
article, “Uneasy lies the head 
that wears a crown!” and was re¬ 
quested to write numerous prefaces 
for books and articles. Also, he 
was invited to lend his name to the 
support of economic, cultural and 
civic movements always springing 
up about the country, address audi¬ 
ences at universities and clubs, 
donate cups and prizes at promi¬ 
nent golf and tennis tournaments 
and others too numerous to mention. 


esty on an easily recognized ruler. 
But more than that, it is Chaplin, 
the timid little man, looking at 
power, warily eyeing the big shot. 
It is the ancient privilege of clowns. 

The beloved little figure with his 
derby, his tiny mustache, his floppy 
trousers and elongated shoes (all 
somewhat modified for the sake of 
realism in “The Great Dictator”) 
has been a pioneer, a creator and 
an inventor. He still is in the new 
story he tells on the screen. 

Charlie is the quiet little man 
who wants to be left alone in the 
ghetto. In his barber shop, he 
strives almost pathetically to 
please. He speaks, but in fright¬ 
ened monosyllables. He just wants 
to be left alone. 

And then he is Hynkel, the rag¬ 
ing, neurotic dictator. He raves and 
rants and emits the most violent of 
guttural explosives. These guttur¬ 
als, incidentally, will speak a new 
language—part English, part jar¬ 
gon, something of a development 
from the double talk French music 
hall Chanson sung by Charlie in 
“Modern Times.” 

The inherent absurdity of pomp 
and circumstance (the core, in 
varying degrees, of all Chaplin 
humor) reaches its fullest and most 
natural expansion in the scenes be¬ 
tween the dictator Hynkel and his 
nearest rival, Napaloni, played 
with bettling brow and outthrust 
jaw by Signor Jack Oakie. 

Many Magnificent Sets 

Chaplin has of necessity sur¬ 
rounded his big men with big sets 
and a great production. “The Great 
Dictator” lends itself—even de¬ 
mands—a lavish hand in its stag¬ 
ing. There is the richly caparisoned 
chancellery of the dictator, the rail¬ 
way station at which a tumultuous 
reception is accorded the arriving 
ruler, streets lined with cheering 
throngs, a gala state banquet and 


a glittering formal ball; and, for 
the opening shot, a World War I 
battlefront in which the camera 
travels 425 feet, one of the longest 
shots on record. Contrasted to these 
are the purlieus of the ghetto, the 
humble shop and the courtyards 
where the little people gather of 
an evening to talk and to listen to 
simple peasant tunes. 

The cast in “The Great Dictator” 
commands attention, much more 
attention than in any previous 
Chaplin picture. Paulette Goddard 
is at the head of the cast and has 
by far the most important and the 
most interesting role. 

Charlie is of course a teacher. 
A patient and devoted attention to 
her histrionics from the master of 
pantomime has borne fruit in Paul¬ 
ette, for in “The Great Dictator,” 
she is called upon to carry the bur¬ 
den of the ghetto story; it is she 
through whom the little people cry 
out, and it is in Paulette that 
Charlie has planted the seed of 
hope for a tomorrow. She is the 
message of youth, of good cheer. 
She is more than “a leading lady.” 

“The Great Dictator” is Charlie 
all over the place. It is Charles 
Chaplin the one man production— 
Chaplin the producer, Chaplin the 
director, Chaplin the star, Chaplin 
the composer. The film bears the 
unmistakable imprint of his indi¬ 
vidual genius. But despite this, 
there has never been a picture so 
varied in its moods and so diversi¬ 
fied in its setting. Never has a pic¬ 
ture projected so much that is new 
and unexpected (even in the use of 
the sound and dialogue which 
Chaplin has always disdained). 
But, above everything else, it is 
Charlie, the little man, laughing 
at his fellow man—laughing long, 
loud and hearty. 

It is healthy to laugh, Charlie 
says. 



FROM BARBER TO BARBARIAN. It’s Charlie Chaplin, playing 
sharply contrasting roles—first a pathetic little ghetto barber, then a 
bombastic, bomb-exploding dictator in “The Great Dictator,” his latest 
and greatest three-ring-circus comedy now showing at the .... Theatre. 

4 B—Two Col. Scene (Mat .30; Cut .50) 


Page Twenty-one 
























































Nothing New 
In Party 
Rallies 


Life Story Of Charlie Chaplin Proves 

That Nothing Succeeds Like Success 



Beneath the banners of the Double Cross, Charlie Chaplin, as “The Great Dictator,” the United Artists 
release now being unreeled at the ......... Theatre, orates in thunderous accents while the crowd looks 

and listens in breathless silence. This is one of the most exciting scenes in Charlie’s greatest and 

funniest comedy. 

3 C—Three Col. Scene (Mat .45; Cut .75) 


Chaplin Is Hero To Other Actors; 
Great Performers Say He's Best 


Superlatives Flow 
When His Name 
Is Discussed 


Of all people in the moving pic¬ 
ture industry, there has been more 
manufactured mystery about Char¬ 
lie Chaplin, whose new comedy, 
“The Great Dictator,” comes to 

the.next week, than any 

of his contemporaries. 

Because he has earned that title, 
“genius”—so often bestowed lightly 
but never more aptly than in Char¬ 
lie’s case—because his picture mak¬ 
ing absorbs practically all his wak¬ 
ing hours, because he has never 
sought the limelight of publicity or 
obviously grabbed at fame, stories 
have cropped up about him like 
mushrooms. 

Actors, interviewers, strangers 
ply his co-workers with questions. 
“What is Chaplin really like?” 

A representative picture of 
Chaplin in each of his productions 
adorns the walls of the publicity 
office. Reginald Gardiner and Bob 
Davis, fellow actors, sauntered in. 

Davis, also a teacher at the cele¬ 
brated Max Reinhardt’s Theatre, 
was like a schoolboy. “May we look 
around?” 

They fairly danced about the 
room. “Reggie! Look at this one 
from the ‘Gold Rush.’ His expres¬ 
sion .” and here his voice 

trailed off in awe. 

“But this one, Bob, from ‘The 
Pilgrim.’ The pathos in the very 
slouch of his body,” said Reggie— 
and here he stopped. 

“And this one from ‘The Circus’ 
—just the back view of him lifting 
himself up by the trousers for a 
peek into the tent.” 

So it went on, from picture to 


BLITZKRIEG 
ON SKEPTICS 

The skeptics who said Charlie 
Chaplin “couldn’t talk” are in 
for a pleasant disappointment 
when the famous comedian’s 
new film, “The Great Dictator,” 
will open at the.Thea¬ 
tre on . 

Charlie always maintained 
that his famous Tramp character 
should not speak. Experiments 
in that field at the start of his 
last picture, “Modern Times” 
convinced him of that for all 
time. No one could visualize the 
type or sort of voice the Tramp 
should have. Dialects were at¬ 
tempted, but in the final analy¬ 
sis, pantomime won out, and the 
famous character with the baggy 
pants, cane and big shoes re¬ 
mained silent. 

But in “The Great Dictator,” 
Charlie deviates for the first 
time and talks on the screen. 
And as though that weren’t 
enough of a novelty, Charlie 
portrays two characters—a hil¬ 
arious situation brought about 
through mistaken identity. 
— 

picture, rapt admiration and affec¬ 
tion for “the little man” leaving 
them incoherent. 

Gardiner, known not only for his 
fine work on the radio as well as 
screen, is famed for his intelligence, 
wit and charm. He went on. “You 
know every place I go—and I’m 
invited to more places now they 
know I’m working with Charlie— 
people immediately gather around 
and ask, ‘What’s he like? As a 
person, and to work with?’ And be¬ 
lieve it or not, all I can say in reply 
is that working with Chaplin has 
been the greatest experience of my 
life. I’ve known him as a friend 
for a long time and admired him, 


All Want To Watch 
Him Work; Some 
Get Nervous 


but until you’ve worked with him, 
you can’t possibly comprehend the 
true greatness of the man.” 

The first day the well-known 
comedian, Billy Gilbert, worked 
with Charlie he was openly ner¬ 
vous. He forgot his lines, was so 
taken aback watching Chaplin 
work, he found himself missing 
cues—an audience instead of an 
actor. 

“Certainly I ‘blew’ my lines,” he 
said when asked about it. “Who 
wouldn’t—working with the great¬ 
est actor perhaps the world has 
ever known. Besides Charlie, none 
of us know anything!” 

Maurice Moscovich, famed for 
his characterizations on both stage 
and screen, watched Charlie al¬ 
most reverently as he took direction 
from him—just as a novice would 
do. And when time came to say 
goodbye, he asked Charlie for a 
picture. He came to the publicity 
department handling the prized 
photograph as tenderly as the most 
idolizing fan. 

“I would so like Charlie to auto¬ 
graph this for me, for he is the 
greatest man I’ve ever known,” he 
said simply. “But I couldn’t pre¬ 
sume upon his time to bother him 
with the request now. Perhaps one 
day when he isn’t busy—a propi¬ 
tious moment—you won’t mind ask¬ 
ing him for me.” 

Jack Oakie, who needs no intro¬ 
duction to the public, is making a 
come-back, so to speak, in the Chap¬ 
lin opus. They often speak of pro¬ 
fessional jealousy, but certainly 
there was no evidence on Oakie’s 
part. When he came over for the 
interview he was as excited as 
though it were his picture debut. 


Comedian Had Little Schooling; Was 
Self-Supporting At Age Of Nine; 
Organized Own Studio in 1918 


One of the most amazing success stories in the world is 
Charlie Chaplin’s. 

At the age of 28, he was not only one of the most famous 
and best loved men in the world, but wealthy in his own right. 
The same year he built the Chaplin Studios starting his own 


Film Mothers 
Her Specialty 


Emma Dunn, who plays the ini*' 
portant role of “Mrs. Jaeckel” in 
the new Charlie Chaplin comedy, 
“The Great Dictator,” now at the 

. Theatre, has enacted 

perhaps more mother roles in her 
career than any other actress. 

And true to tradition she again 
has a similar role in “The Great 
Dictator,” only this time acts as 
sort of “foster mother” to orphaned 
Paulette Goddard in the picture. 

Starting in her early twenties 
as “Ase,” she “mothered” the fam¬ 
ous Richard Mansfield in “Peer 
Gynt.” In “The Warrens of Vir¬ 
ginia,” stage play produced by 
David Belasco, she was parent to 
Mary Pickford and Cecil B. de 
Mille. 

“Old Lady 31” was written es¬ 
pecially for Miss Dunn by Rachel 
Crothers, and she scored a sensa¬ 
tional success on Broadway in the 
play. Other notable stage appear¬ 
ances were co-starring roles with 
Henry Miller and Ruth Chatterton 
in “The Changelings” and with 
the late Alice Brady in “Sinners.” 

Such widely diversified charac¬ 
terizations as the Spanish mother 
of Gary Cooper in “The Texan,” 
southern mother of Lawrence Tib- 
bett in “The Prodigal,” Italian 
mother of Leo Carrillo in “The 
Guilty Generation,” Jewish mother 
in “Cohens and Kelleys in Holly¬ 
wood,” a German mother in “The 
Man I Killed” prove her versa¬ 
tility as a dialectician, and her first 
talking picture found her playing 
an Irish mother to the three Moors 
brothers—Owen, Tom and Matt. 



Jack Oakie as the other dictator in 
“The Great Dictator.” 

17 A—One Col. Scene 
(Mat .15; Cut .25) 


producing company which, since 
its inception in 1918, has never pro¬ 
duced anything but artistic as well 
as financial successes. 

The son of theatrical parents, he 
earned his own living from the time 
he was nine years old. By his own 
admission, his schooling was spas¬ 
modic. But even as a very young 
boy, those who knew him say, 
Charlie was studious. When he 
joined the Karno Repertoire Com¬ 
pany as a lad in his teens, he was 
never to be found in the “gay spots” 
when the day’s work was done, as 
did the other young fellows in the 
troupe. Instead he would remain 
in his room, trying out new steps, 
figuring out “funny business” that 
would make his part of the show 
outstanding. 

That he succeeded is a matter of 
record, for in 1913, when the com¬ 
pany came to the United States, an 
agent for Mack Sennett spotted 
him immediately. From that mem¬ 
orable day in November when he 
entered pictures, his rise has been 
meteoric. 

Formed Own Company 

After the first two Sennett pic¬ 
tures, he wrote and directed his 
own comedies. When his contract 
expired, Charlie signed with Es- 
sanay at a greatly increased salary, 
then on to the Mutual and First 
National Companies in rapid suc¬ 
cession. Upon completion of this 
latter contract, he decided to pro¬ 
duce for himself. And who will ever 
forget “Shoulder Arms,” “The 
Kid,” “Woman of Paris,” “Gold 
Rush,” “Circus,” “City Lights” and 
“Modern Times?” 

Author, producer, director and 
star of all his productions, with the 
single exception of “Woman of 
Pans,” in which he did not appear, 
Charlie’s talents appear endless. 
Writer of two books, many songs as 
well as the greater part of the musi¬ 
cal scores of “City Lights,” “Modern 
Times” and “The Great Dictator,” 
he has an enviable reputation as 
an athlete, having held the amateur 
long distance running champion¬ 
ship in England, is an expert tennis 
player, angler, musician (playing 
any musical instrument extant, al 
though he has never taken a lesson 
nor can he read music), is a recog¬ 
nized authority on economics and 
world affairs. In fact, a list of what 
Charlie cannot do would be easier 
to compile than one containing his 
many accomplishments. 


A Real Veteran 


Paul Weigel, who plays “Papa 
Agar” in the new Charlie Chaplin 
comedy, “The Great Dictator,” com¬ 
ing on . to the . 

Theatre, was born in 1867 in Halle, 
Germany, of Austrian-Italian par¬ 
entage. 

He has appeared on the stage 
since 1886 in the United States in 
support of such well known stars 
as Mrs. Fiske, in “Becky Sharp,” 
with Julia Marlowe in “When 
Knighthood was in Flower,” the 
famous Maurice Barrymore and 
practically every noted star of his 
time. 

From 1906 to 1915 he acted and 
directed German stock in Denver, 
Colorado. Entering pictures in 1916 
playing Fanny Ward’s father in 
“Each Pearl a Tear,” some of his 
late successes have been “May¬ 
time,” “The Great Waltz,” “Never 
Say Die,” “The Life of Louis Pas¬ 
teur” and “Zola.” 

“The Great Dictator,” which was 
written and directed by Charlie 
Chaplin himself, also features in its 
cast Paulette Goddard, Jack Oakie, 
Henry Daniell, Billy Gilbert and 
Emma Dunn. 


Page Twenty-three 
















































PUT ACROSS YOUR GREAT COMEDY 
WITH THESE SPECIAL U. A. ACCESSORIES! 





Seven-Foot Standee 

18 -Inch-High Cutouts 

These attractive cutouts, exact replicas of the 7-foot 
standee, will tie in your away-from-theatre selling with 
the seven-foot-high standee displayed in your lobby or in 
front of your theatre. The 18" cutouts are ideally con¬ 
structed for use in window tieups, counter displays, or 
displays in hotel lobbies or other public or semipublic 
places where ordinary window cards are not acceptable. 
Distribute them widely around town for sustained selling 
on the rib-tickling theme of the picture. Price: 1-15, 25c 
each; 16-25, 23c; 26-50, 20c; 50 and over, 18c. 


SPECTACULAR SEVEN.FOOT 
STANDEE FOR YOUR LOBBY 


Here are the special banners that will really sell your 
picture in the flash manner from your marquee! Illus¬ 
trated here are a giant 9-foot streamer (left) and a 
4 1 /2-foot banner (right), made of heavy, durable silk 
in four colors. The Chaplin art sells big laughs on 
sight; the design arrests the eye; the title and star 
name are flashed across in strong, bold letters; the 
colors are vivid, unforgettable. 

These silk banners will make a particularly daz¬ 
zling display under a baby spot. And they're ideally 
suited for use in combination. For example, the big 
9-foot streamer flanked by two of the banners, one on 
each side of the marquee, will give you a show-selling 
splash that will dominate the entire street! Prices 
(outright sale only) : 9-foot Streamer—$4.75; 4!/2- 
foot Banner—$1.75. 


SPECIAL STREAMER 
AND BANNER 


■*3f 


^HE record Standee illustrated at right—the biggest ever made for motion pic¬ 
ture display—has been prepared by United Artists for your campaign on "The 
Great Dictator." Seven feet high, brilliantly eye-commanding in full color, it's 
a salvo of show-selling that will catch them right between the eyes! This ex¬ 
tremely decorative and exciting display, which sums up the entire hilarious 
comedy theme of the picture, will cause talk all around town the minute you 

set it up in your lobby. Dis¬ 
play it inside the lobby for 
weeks before your show 
date, and out in front during 
the engagement. Or, if set 
up atop your marquee, this 
sensational display will com¬ 
mand the entire street. 

Your seven - foot - high 
Chaplin standee is furnished 
complete with a strong easel 
backing, and is packed for 
shipping in a corrugated 
container. Price (outright 
sale only), $5.00. 


Chaplin Derbies 


Here's your indispensable Charlie Chaplin 
accessory—Chaplin derbies that are exact re¬ 
productions of the world-famous headgear worn 
by Charlie throughout his career! Worn by your 
doormen and ushers, as well as by newsboys, taxi 
drivers, and as many local kids as can get hold of 
them, they'll carry the message of your unparal¬ 
leled Chaplin laugh show all over town! 

These are no imitation derbies, but are made 
of real felt and will stand up under wear and 
weather looking as good as new. Furnished with 
each derby is a white cloth hat band 1 V 2 " wide, 
which comes separately so that theatre and 
playdate can be imprinted. These bands are 
easily attached with staple or safety pin. Prices 
of derbies: 1-15, 30c each; 16-25, 27c; 26-50, 
25c; 51-100, 23c; 101 and over, 21c. 


18-Inch Cutout 


ISine-Foot Streamer 


4V2-Foot Banner 


Page Twenty-four 




1 






%% h 28 Lobby Displays 
Rental 20c Each 


ICTATOR 


Window Card. Non-rental 
Price 7c 

Inquire for Quantity Rates 


Announcement Slide. Non-rental Price ISc 


CHAPLIN k\ 


£+3. 


^DICTATOR 


Y OUR showmanship campaign 
on “The Great Dictator” has a 
tremendous asset in the carefully 
prepared set of United Artists ac¬ 
cessories—show-selling aids which 
do a complete job of getting across 
the picture’s gorgeous comedy with 
greatest effectiveness! This visual 
material on the Chaplin masterpiece 
has direct seat-selling results, in all 
phases of outdoor exploitation! 
Plan now for a complete accessories 
campaign—at and away from your 
theatre. Order on U.A.’s econom¬ 
ical rental plan! 


Sol ©f Eight 11 x 14 Lobby Displays 
Rental 35c for Set 


THE WOULD WIU BE LAUGHING AGAIN ... 


14 u 3 6 Insert Card 
Rental 12c 




*1 


Copyright MCMXL by United Artists Corp., New York, N. Y. 






































































'T'HERE is no substitute for showmanship, and no showmanship approach 
to showings of “The Great Dictator” can be complete without a cam¬ 
paign featuring the great set of United Artists posters! Your poster paper 
on this long-awaited motion picture is designed for the most effective 
and hard-hitting show-selling possible—in one of the greatest exploita¬ 
tion pictures in many years. Plan now for a vast town-wide campaign! 
Order your set of U. A. posters on the economical rental plan. 








UNITED ARTISTS CORP. kindly ship C.O.D. the following: 

"THE GREAT DICTATOR” RENTAL ITEMS 

The @dverti»,ng material lilted hereon it copyrighted and is not sold, bet 3« based only <®r the period 
the license granted for the exhibition at the below theatre of the respective pfe®t®pS@ys identified 3® 
swch material and for use only in eonjwnetion with sweh exhibition thereat. 


TITLE: PLAYDATE: 


QUAN- 

T1TY 

ITEM 

QUAN¬ 

TITY 

STEM 


One Sheets 


22 x 28 Lobbies (Set of 2) 


Three Sheets 


14 x 36 Inserts 


Six Sheets 


40x60 


llxl 4—Lobbies (Set of 8) 


8x10 Black and White Stills 


NON-RENTAL ITEMS 



| Twenty-four Sheets 

Window Cords 


I Slides 




I Heralds 




LIST YOUR MATS HERE: 


LIST NOVELTIES OR MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS HERE: 


FULL CREDIT 
IF RETURNED IN GOOD 
CONDITION 


SIGNATURE: 











































* 


* 


POPULAR PRICE AD SECTION 



ryCdtCSt 


ALL THE LAUGHS OF 
THE ROADSHOW HIT! 


UUGH 


Ad No. 93D —Four col. x 179 line? 
(Mat .60; Cut 1.00) 











f 



HE TALKS 


The Great 
DICTATOR 


Produced* written and dtroeted by 

i:- ; : §.€BAKLIS CHAPLIN 

«»** PAULETTE GODDARD 

MCKDWf&M" REGINALD 
GARDINER . RILEY GILBERT » MAURICE 
: MO£jGGVlCtf : (ftra tfuiiffd <L 




ALL THE LAUGHS OF 
THE ROADSHOW HIT! 


* 




♦ 


J 


THEATRE 


4 


* 


Ad No. 94D—Four col. x 165 lines 
(Mat .60; Cut 1,00) 









+ 


♦ 


* 



PRODUCED, WRITTEN find 
DIRECTED by 

CHARLES CHAPLIN 


WI ™ PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAKIE • HENRY DANIELL • REGINALD 
GARDINER • BILLY GILBERT • MAURICE MOSCOVICH 

Released thru United Artists 


LAUGH 

WITH 


HE 

The G 


ALL 

THE LAUGHS 
OF THE ROAD¬ 
SHOW HIT! 


A 


Ad No. 95C —Three col. x 215 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 










THEATRE 


Ad No. 97C —Three col. x 123 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 



DIRECT FROM $2.20 BROADWAY RUN! 



The Great 

DICTATOR 


Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

Hid, PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAK1E . HENRY DANIELL 
RECINALD CARDINER. BILLY GILBERT 
MAURICE MOSCOVICH 
Released thru United Artists 


Ad No. 104A —One col. x 94 lines 
(Mat .15; Cut .25) 























LAUGH WITH 


HE TALKS in his greatest comedy 

The Great DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by 

CHARLES CHAPLIN 

W,TH PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAKIE • HENRY DANIELL • REGINALD 
GARDINER • BILLY GILBERT-MAURICE MOSCOV1CH 

Released thru United Artists 


THEATRE 


Ad No. 98B—Two col. x 180 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 












DIRECT FROM $2.20 
BROADWAY RUN! 


“"'that will be heard around the world! 





in his new comedy 

The Great 
DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLES CHAPLIN 
with PAULETTE GODDARD 

Released thru United Artists 


Ad No. 103A —One col. x 109 lines 
(Mat .15; Cut .25) 




in his new comedy 

The Great 

DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

with PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAKIE • HENRY DANIELL 
REGINALD GARDINER . BILLY GILBERT 
MAURICE MOSCOVICH 
Released thru United Artists 


Ad No. 100B —Two col. x 79 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 


DIRECT FROM BROADWAY 
LONG-RUN ENGAGEMENT 
AT $2.20 




in his new comedy 

The Great 
DICTATOR 


Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLES CHAPLIN 
with PAULETTE GODDARD 
Jack Oakie • Henry Danibll 
Reginald Gardiner • Billy Gilbert 
Maurice Moscovich 
Released thru United Artists 


Ad No. 101B—Two col. x 74 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 



















in his new comedy 


The Great 
DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLES CHAPLIN 
with PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAKIE . HENRY DANIELL 
REGINALD GARDINER • BILLY GILBERT 
MAURICE MOSCOVICH 
Released thru United Artists 


Ad No. 102A—One col. x 1 1 5 lines 
(Mat .15; Cut .25) 


* 



The Great 
DICTATOR 


I'M'I.ETTK CODI) \l?l) 



awn WITH 


hi: talks 


m Ms greatest comedy 


written Ami directed by 

CHARLES CHAPLIN 


PAULETTE GODDARD 

g: JACK 0AK1K ♦ HEKfcK DANIELL 
RECIMLD GARDINER « MU GfLBlRT 
&AIRICE MOSCOVICH 


Released fhrn United Jrtisls 


THEATRE 


Ad No. 96C —Three col. x 180 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 


Ad No. 105A—One col. x 54 lines 
(Mat .15; Cut .25) 













*N 



) 


% 











* 









PRINTED IN U.S.A. 


' 


THE WORLD IS STILL LAUGHING 

for a Second Hilarious Week! 


HE TALKS! 



There’s never been such laughter! There 
have never been such crowds! The entire 
city is rocking with glee—as the master of 
comedy reveals his greatest film achieve¬ 
ment!... Audiences and critics alike hail 
it as the finest Chaplin picture of all 
times! Of course, we MUST hold it over! 

(Review quotes go here) 



in his new comedy 

The Great DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by Charles Chaplin 

with PAULETTE GODDARD 
Jack Oakie • Henry Daniell • Reginald Gardiner 
Billy Gilbert • Maurice Moscovich 
Released thru United Artists 







/ Capacity audi- 



/ ences at the 



/ Astor Theatre 



V . in New York 



/// are paying*2.20 



jf' for the same 


laughs! 



LOEWS 

DOORS OPEN AT 11 A. M. 


USUAL CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCES 

Come anytime and see a complete show 

All Matinees.75{T) including 

All Evenings.$1.10) all taxes 

NOTE: This picture will not be shown anywhere 
at lower prices until at least the summer of 1941. 

Ad No. 89D—Four col. x 131 lines 
(Mat .60; Cut 1.00) 


NOTE TO THEATRE MANAGER 

Where local reviews are available, sub¬ 
stitute them for body copy now in ad. 













The World Is Laughing Again! 

The most eagerly-awaited picture 
ever on the screen is here — and 
it more than fulfills your wildest 
expectations! Laughing crowds, 
enthusiastic critics agree that 
this is the great Chaplin’s funni¬ 
est comedy! You MUST see it! 



The Great DICTATOR 



Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLES CHAPLIN 
with 

PAULETTE GODDARD 
Jack Oakie • Henry Daniell 
Reginald Gardiner 
Billy Gilbert 
Maurice Moscovich 

Released thru United Artists 


HE TALKS! 



Now at LOEW S 

USUAL CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCES 

Come anytime and see a complete show DOORS OPEN 


All Matinees.75c | including AT 11 A. M - 

All Evenings.$1.10) all taxes 


NOTE: This picture will not be shown anywhere at 
lower prices until at least the summer of 1941. 


Ad No. 90B —Two col. x 136 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 


NOTE TO THEATRE MANAGER: 

Where local reviews are available, sub¬ 
stitute them for body copy now in ad. 



THE WORLD IS LAUGHING AGAIN! 


The most eagerly- 
awaited picture ever on 
the screen is here — and 
it more than fulfills your 
wildest expectations!... 
Laughing crowds, en¬ 
thusiastic critics agree 
that this is the great 
Chaplin’s funniest com¬ 
edy! You MUST see it! 



in his new comedy 


The Great DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by Charles Chaplin 
with 

PAULETTE GODDARD 

Jack Oakie • Henry Daniell 
Reginald Gardiner • Billy Gilbert 
Maurice Moscovich 
Released thru United Artists 

HE TALKS! 



Now at LOEW S 

USUAL CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCES 

Come anytime and see a complete show DOORS OPEN 


All Matinees.75c ) including AT 11 A. 

All Evenings.$1.10) all taxes 


NOTE: This picture will not be shown anywhere at 
lower prices until at least the summer of 1941. 


Ad No. 91B —Two col. x 1 10 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 


THE WORLD IS LAUGHING AGAIN! 


The most eagerly- 
awaited picture ever on 
the screen is here — and 
it more than fulfills your 
wildest expectations!... 
Laughing crowds, en¬ 
thusiastic critics agree 
that this is the great 
Chaplin’s funniest com- 

HE edy! You MUST see it! 
TALKS! 



The Great DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by Charles Chaplin 
with PAULETTE GODDARD 
Jack Oakie • Henry Daniell • Reginald Gardiner 
Billy Gilbert • Maurice Moscovich 
Released thru United Artists 

Now at LOEW S 

USUAL CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCES 

Come anytime and see a complete show DOORS OPI 


All Matinees.75c ) including AT 11 A. M. 

All Evenings.$1.10) all taxes 


NOTE: This picture will not be shown anywhere at 
lower prices until at least the summer of 1941. 



Ad No. 92B —Two col. x 89 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 















* 



Ad No. 80C —Three col. x 100 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 


* 



“One of the greatest pictures 

ever made!” —Damon Runyon 


in his new comedy 

The Great 

DICTATOR 


Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

PAULETTE GODDARD 






C^aAj&e/ 

Chip&Hs 

m his new comedy 

The Great 

DICTATOR 


x 

X 


Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN 
wul, PAULETTE GODDARD 


Ad No. 83B —Two col. x 46 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 


/V 


Ad No. 84B —Two col. x 45 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 




















































“New Yorchids to Charles TKa 

Chaplin’s ‘The Great M11“ UI Cill 

Dictator’”. __ _ ___ _ __ _ __ 

—Walter Winchell Tfc Y A 1 YD 


Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

,„I/| PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAK1E . HENRY DANIELL 
RECINALD GARDINER • BILLY GILBERT 
MAURICE MOSCOVICH 
Released thru United Artists 


Ad No. 81B —Two col. x 77 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 



in his new comedy 

The Great 
DICTATOR 



it). 



HE TALKS! 

and how! 


“One of the greatest pic¬ 
tures ever made!" 

—Damon Runyon 


in his new comedy 

The Great 

DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN 
with PAULETTE GODDARD 

Jack Oakie • Henry Daniell 
Reginald Gardiner • Billy Gilbert 
Maurice Moscovick 
Released thru United Artists 


Ad No. 82B —Two col. x 60 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 


'* 


Ad No. 86A —One col. x 50 lines 



Ad No. 87A —One col. x 40 lines 
(Mat .15; Cut .25) 


Ad No. 88A —One col. x 29 lines 
(Mat. 15; Cut .25) 


Ad No. 85A —One col. x 60 lines y \ 
(Mat .15; Cut .25) 





























ADVERTISING 

- - m - ■ ms&ms i =3 . ^- — e b paa . . - 




The Great 

DICTATOR 



Produced, written and directed by CHARLES CHAPLIN 

with PAULETTE G-ODDARD 
JAGK OAKIE • HENRY DANIELL 
REGINALD GARDINER • BILLY GILBERT 
MAURICE MOSCOVICH . 

Released thru United Artists 


THEATRE 


Detail 
Goes Here 


Ad No. 19E —Five col. x 160 lines 
(Mat .75; Cut 1.25) 













jfaojh: 


/ 


that will be heard round the world! 


Chaplin talks in his 
•w comedy masterpiece 



The GREAT DICTATOR 


V* 



Produced, written and directed by 

CHARLES CHAPLIN 
with PAULETTE GODDARD 

Jack Oakie • Henry Daniell 
Reginald Gardiner • Billy Gilbert 
Maurice Moscovicii 
Released thru United Artists 


THEATRE 


Detail 
Goes Here 


Ad No. 28C —Three col. x 93 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 



THEATRE 


Detail 
Goes Here 


Ad No. 30C —Three col. x 85 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 















"The laughter for which 
the world is waiting!” 


in his new comedy 

The fireat 
DICTATOR 



Produced, written and directed by’ 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN 
with PAULETTE GODDARD 

Jack Oakie • Henry Daniell 
Reginald Gardiner • Billy Gilbert 
Maurice Moscovich 
Released thru United Artists 


THEATRE 


Detail 
Goes Here 


Ad No. 29C —Three col. x 91 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 


% 



/y- 



C^aAj&ey C/tadui, 

in his new comedy / 

The Great DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by Charlie Chaplin 

With PAULETTE GODDARD 

Jack Oakie • Henry Daniell 
Reginald Gardiner • Billy Gilbert 
Maurice Moscovich 
Released thru United Artists 

| Buffalo Premiere at the Great Lakes Theatre Thursday, 

Oct. 31st at 8:30 P. M. Regular Continuous Performances 
Start Friday, Nov. 1st. Doors Open 11 A. M. 

X __ 


Detail Goes Here 




Ad No. 36B —Two col. x 1 00 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 



































that will be heard around the world! 



Produced, written and directed by CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

PAULETTE GODDARD 
JACK OAKIE • HENRY DANIELL 
REGINALD GARDINER • BILLY GILBERT 
MAURICE MOSCOYICH 
Released thru United Artists 


% 



THEATRE 


Detail 
Goes Here 


Ad No. 35B —Two col. x 1 47 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 



the world will be laughing again! 




in his new comedy 


The Great 
DICTATOR 


Produced, written and directed by 

CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

with PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAKIE • HENRY DANIELL 
REGINALD GARDINER • BILLY GILBERT 
MAURICE MOSCOVICH 
Released thru United Artists 


THEATRE 


Detail 
Goes Here 


\ 


Ad No. 26C —Three col. x 1 14 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 







































TEASER ADS ... to precede opening announcement campaign 



Ad No. 39B —Two col. x 50 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 

/ 


Ad No. 40B —Two col. x 50 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 




Gha/iue/ CJuipduHy 
/ 



^ * 

r JDI 

- 4 - & 



/§ * 

in his new comedy 

The Great DICTATOR 


1 / RL 

in his new comedy 

The Great DICTATOR 


* 


Ad No. 41 B —Two col. x 50 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 


Ad No. 42B —Two col. x 50 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 




















*# 


]^e talks 






in his new comedy 

The Great DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by Charlie Chaplin 

with PAULETTE GODDARD 


Jack Oakie 
Henry Daniell 
Reginald Gardiner 



Billy Gilbert 
Maurice Moscovich 
Released thru United Artists 


THEATRE 


Detail 
Goes Here 



Ad No. 31C —Three col. x 72 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 


* 



The Great 
DICTATOR 


Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

with PAULETTE GODDARD 
JACK OAKIE * HENRY DANIELL 
REGINALD GARDINER • BILLY GILBERT 
MAURICE MOSCOVICH 

Released thru United Artists 


THEATRE 


Detail 
Goes Here 




[ ) 


Ad No. 33C— Three col. x 72 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 

























in his new comedy 


The Great 
DICTATOR 


Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

with PAULETTE GODDARD 
JACK OAKIE . HENRY DAN1ELL 
REGINALD GARDINER ■ BILLY GILBERT 
MAURICE MOSCOVICH 

Released thru United Artists 


THEATRE 


Detail 
Goes Here 


Ad No. 32C —Three col. x 72 lines 


(Mat .45; Cut .75) 



in his new comedy 


The Great 
DICTATOR 


Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

with PAULETTE GODDARD 
JACK OAKIE . HENRY DANIELL 
REGINALD GARDINER • BILLY GILBERT 
MAURICE MOSCOVICb 

Released thru United Artists 


THEATRE 


Detail 
Goes Here 


/v 


Ad No. 34C —Three col. x 72 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 































The Great DICTATOR 


WORLD PREMIERE 

TUESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 15th 
at 8:30 P.M. at both the 


ASTOR and CAPITOL 

BROADWAY & 45th ST. BROADWAY & 51st ST, 

Buy reserved seats now 
in advance for future 
performances. Mati¬ 
nees at 2:45. Evenings 
at 8:45. (Extra Mid¬ 
night Show Sat. & Ex¬ 
tra 6 p.m. shows on 
Sat. & Sun.) 

PRICES: 

Matinees, 75c, 85c, 

$1.10. (Sat., Sun. & Hoi. 

Matinees; also Mid¬ 
night & Extra Shows— 

75c, 85c, $1.10, $1.65.) 

Evenings, $1.10, $1.65, 

$2.20 (including Sat., 

Suh.&Hols.), All Prices 
Include Tax. 


Regular continuous 
performances. Come 
any time and see a com¬ 
plete show. Doors open 
at 10 a.m. 


PRICES: 

Before 5 p.m., Orch. & 
Bale. 75c. (Sat., Sun. & 
Hols. Before 3 p.m.). 
After 5 p.m., Orch. & 
Bale., $1.10. (Sat., Sun. 
& Hols, after 3 p.m.). 
All Prices Include Tax. 



Don't forget—Reserved Seats Now On Sale at the Astor/or 
all subsequent performances. Mail Orders For Astor Filled 
In Order of Receipt. 


Ad No. 37B —Two col. x 78 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 


NEW YORK CITY 
ADVANCE CAMPAIGN 


C/taA&ey Ciap&tt/ 

in his new comedy 

The Great DICTATOR 


RELEASE!) THRU UNITE0 ARTISTS 


Q0orld c^Jremiere 
TUESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 15th 
at 8:30 P. M. at both the 

ASTOR and CAPITOL 



ASTOR THEATRE 

Broadway and 45th Street 
Matinees at 2:45. Evenings 
at 8:45. (Extra Midnight 
Show Saturday and Extra 
6 p. m. show on Sunday ). 
PRICES: Matinees,75c,85c, 
$1.10. (Saturday, Sunday & 
Holiday Matinees; also Mid¬ 
night and Extra Shows—75c, 
85c, $1.10, $1.65.) Evenings, 
$1.10, $1.65, $2.20 (includ¬ 
ing Saturday, Sunday and 
Hols) .All Prices I net ude Tax 


CAPITOL THEATRE 

Broadway and Slat Street 
Regular continuous per¬ 
formances. Come any time 
and see a complete show. 
Doors open at 9 a 
PRICES: Before 5 p. 
Orchestra and Balcony, 75c 
(Saturday, Sunday and Hoi 
idays Before 3 p.m.). After 
5 p. m., Orchestra and Bal¬ 
cony, $1.10. (Saturday, Sun¬ 
day and Holidays after 3 
p.m.). All Prices Include Tax 


Don’t forget — Reserved Seats Now On Sale at 
the Astor for all subsequent performances. 
Mail Orders For Astor Filled In Order of Receipt. 


Ad No. 38B —Two col. x 75 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 


X 



x 


. _e talks... and how! 


Cn&pouo 

in his new comedy • 

The Great DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by Charles Chaplin 

with PAULETTE GODDARD 

Jack Oakie • Henry Daniell • Reginald Gardiner 
Billy Gilbert • Maurice Moscovitch 
Released thru United Artists 


World Premiere 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15™ AT 8:30 P. M. 

at both the 

ASTOR and CAPITOL THEATRES 


• ASTOR THEATRE Broadway & 45th street 

Matinees at 2:45. Evenings at 8:45. (Extra Midnight Show Saturday 
and Extra 6 p.m. show on Sunday.) PRICES: Matinees, 75c, 85c, 
$1.10. (Saturday, Sunday and Holiday Matinees; also Midnight and 
Extra Shows—75c, 85c, $1 10, $1.65.) Evenings, $1.10, $1.65, $2.20 
(including Saturday, Sunday and Holidays) All Prices Include Tax. 

® CAPITOL THEATRE b’way & sist street 

Regular continuous performances. Come any time and see a complete 
show. Doors open at 9 a. m. PRICES: Before 5 p. m., Orchestra 
and Balcony, 75c. (Saturday, Sunday and Holidays Before 3 p.m.) 
After 5 p. m.. Orchestra and Balcony, $1.10 (Saturday, Sunday and 
Holidays after 3 p.m.) All Prices Include Tax. 


I _ Don't forget—Reserved Seats now on sale at the Astor for all subse- 

(( quenl performances. Mail Orders for Astor filled In order of receipt. 



Ad No. 25C —Three col. x 1 32 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 
















































































XX 


Soon the world will laugh again . .. 


The Great DICTATOR 

will have its 

World Premiere 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15™ 

AT 8:30 p.m. AT BOTH THE 
ASTOR and CAPITOL 
Theatres 




I ASTOR THEATRE 

BROADWAY St 45th STREET 

Buy reserved seats now in ad¬ 
vance for future performances. 
Mats, at 2:45. Eves, at 8:45. 
(Extra Midnight Show Sat. 5c 

I Extra6 p. m. shows on Sat. 5c Sun.) 

PRICES: 

Mats.. 75c, 85c, {51.10. (Sat., 
Sun. 5c Hoi. Mats: also Mid¬ 
night 6c Extra Shows—75c, 85c, 
551 10, SI.65). Eves , SI 10. 
SI.65, S2.20 (including Sat., Sun. 
5c Hols.) All Prices Include Tax. 


CAPITOL THEATRE 

BROADWAY & 51st STREET 

Regular continuous perform¬ 
ances. Come any time and see 
a complete show. Doors open 
at 10 a.m. 

PRICES: 

Before 5 p.m. Orch 5c Bale. 
75c. (Sat., Sun 5c Hols. Before 
3 p m.) After 5 p.m. Orch. 
5c Bale., St 10 (Sat., Sim. 5c 
Hols after 3 p.m.) All Prices 
Include Tax. 



The Great DICTATOR 


XX 



Produced, written and directed by CHARLES CHAPLIN 

with PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAKIE • HENRY DANIELL • REGINALD GARDINER 
BILLY GILBERT . MAURICE MOSCOVITCH 

Released thru United Artiite 


Don't forget—Reserved Seals On Sale Tomorrow at the Astor for all sub¬ 
sequent performances. Mail Orders For Astor Filled In Order of Receipt 


Ad No. 21C —Three col. x 166 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 
























HE TALKS! 



TOMORROW, THE LAUGHTER FOR WHICH 
THE WORLD HAS BEEN WAITING... 



in his new comedy 


The Great DICTATOR 


Produced, ■written and directed by CHARLES CHAPLIN 

with PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAKIE • HENRY DANIELL • REGINALD GARDINER 
BILLY GILBERT • MAURICE MOSCOVITCH 

Released thru United Artists 


World Premiere 

•TOMORROW, OCTOBER 15th at 8:30 P. M. 


at both the 


ASTOR and CAPITOL Theatres 


ASTOR THEATRE CAPITOL THEATRE 


B’WAY & 51bi STREET 


B’WAY & 45th STREET 


Regular continuous performances. 
Come any time and see a complete 
show. Doors open at 9 a.m. 


Matinees at 2:45. Evenings at 8:45. 
(Extra Midnight Show Saturday and 
Extra 6 p.m. show on Sunday.) 


PRICES: 


PRICES: 


Before 5 p.m., Orchestra and Bal¬ 
cony, 75c. (Saturday, Sunday and 
Holidays Before 3 p.m.) After 5 
p.m.. Orchestra and Balcony, $1.10. 
(Saturday, Sunday and Holidays 
after 3 p.m.) All Prices Include Tax. 


Matinees, 75c, 85c, $1.10. ^Saturday, 
Sunday and Holiday Matinees; also 
Midnight and Extra Shows—75c, 85c, 
$1.10, $1.65.) Evenings, $1.10, $1.65, 
$2.20 (including Saturday, Sunday 
& Holidays). All Prices Include Tax. 


Don't forget — Reserved. Seats now on sale at the Astor for all subsequent 
performances. Mail Orders for Astor filled in order of receipt. 



Ad No. 22C —Three col. x 1 50 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 

























* 


O M 0 R R O W. . . the world will 
start laughing again ... 




HE TALKS! 


in his new comedy 

The Great DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by Charles Ghaplln 
with PAULETTE GODDARD 
Jack Oakie • Henry Daniell • Reginald Gardiner 
Billy Gilbert • Maurice Moscovitch 
Released thru United Artists 
• 

World Premiere Tomorrow 
at 8:30 P. M. 

AST OR and CAPITOL Theatres 


ASTOR THEATRE 

B’WAY & 45th STREET 

Matinees at 2:45 Evenings at 8-45. 
(Extra Midnight Show" Saturday and 
Extra 6 p.m. show on Sunday ) 

PRICES■ 

Matinees. 75c. 85c, $1 10. (Saturday. 
Sunday and Holiday Matinees, also 
Midnight and Extra Shows—75c, 85c. 
$1.10, $1.65.) Evenings, $1 10. $1 85, 
$2.20 (including Saturday. Sunday 
& Holidays). All Puces Include Tax. 


Don't forget—Reserved Seats now i 
performances. Mail Orders for 


CAPITOL THEATRE 

B’ WAY & Slat STREET 

Regular continuous performances. 
Come any time and see a complete 
show Doors open at 9 a m. 

PRICES. 

Before 5 p.m.. Orchestra and Bal¬ 
cony. 75c. (Saturday, Sunday and 
Holidays Before 3 p.m.) After 5 
p.m., Orchestra and. Balcony, $1.10. 
(Saturday Sunday and Holidays 
after 3pm.) All Prices Include rax. 


sale at the Astor for all subsequent 
Astor filled in order of receipt. 




The Great DICTATOR 

RELEASED THRU UNITED ARTISTS 



Ad No. 24C —Three col. x 1 33 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 




at 8:30 P. M. at both the 
ASTOR and CAPITOL Theatres 


4 



ASTOR THEATRE 

Broadway & 45th St. 



CAPITOL THEATRE 

Broadway & 51st St. 


Matinees at 2:45. Evenings 
at 8:45. (Extra Midnight 
Show Saturday and Extra 
6 p. m. show on Sunday.) 
PRICES: 

Mats. 75c, 85c, $1.10. (Sat., 
Sun. & Hoi. Mats.; also 
Midnight & Extra Shows— 
75c, 85c, $1.10, $1.65.) Eves. 
$1.10, $1.65, $2.20 (includ¬ 
ing Sat., Sun. & Hols.) All 
Prices Include Tax. 


Regular continuous per¬ 
formances. Come any time 
and see a complete show. 
Doors open at 9 a. m. 
PRICES: 

Before 5 p.m., Orch. & 
Balcony 75c. (Sat., Sun. & 
Holidays Before 3 p. m.) 
After 5 p.m., Orch. & 
Balcony $1.10. (Sat., Sun. 
& Hols, after 3 p. m.) All 
Prices Include Tax. 



Ad No. 27C —Three col. x 100 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 


XX 





























































X* 



world greets a comedy masterpiece! 
WORLD PREMIERE 
TONIGHT at 8:30 

at the ASTOR and CAPITOL Theatres 



in his new comedy 

The Great DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by CHARLIE CHAPLIN 
with PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAKIE • HENRY DANIELL • REGINALD GARDINER 
BILLY GILBERT • MAURICE MOSCOVICH 
Released thru United Artists 


ASTOR THEATRE 

B’WAY & 45th STREET 

Matinees at 2:45. Evenings at 8:45. 
(Extra Midnight Show Saturday and 
Extra 6 p.m. show on Sunday.) 

PRICES : 

Matinees, 75c, 85c, $1.10. (Saturday, Sun¬ 
day and Holiday Matinees; also Midnight 
and Extra Shows—75c, 85c, $1.10, $1.65.) 
Evenings, $1.10, $1.65, $2.20 (including 
Sat., Sun. & Hols ,).All Prices Include Tax. 


CAPITOL THEATRE 

B’WAY A 51,1 STREET 

Regular continuous performances. Come 
any time and see a complete show. Doors 
open at 9 a.m. 

PRICES: 

Before 5 p.m.. Orchestra and Balcony. 
75c. (Saturday, Sunday and Holidays 
Before 3 p.m.) After 5 p.m., Orchestra 
and Balcony, $1.10. (Sat., Sun. & Hols, 
after 3 p.m.) All Prices Include Tax. 


Don't forget—Reserved Seats now on sale at the Astor for all subsequent 
performances. Mail Orders for Astor filled in order of receipt. 



Ad No 20D —-Four col. x 1 52 lines 
(Mat .60; Cut 1.00) 


A 


X 




A 


** 



























Today 


. . . and every day 
there are 

31,640 s u e n a r t e s s a e t rv t e h? CAPITOL 

(7 Continuous Performances . . . 4520 Seats for Each Performance. 

Doors Open 9 A. M.) 

2,024 Reserved Seals al the ASTOR 

(Twice Daily, 2:45 & 8:45.1,012 Seats at Each Performance. 
Buy Seats NOW in Advance for Subsequent Performances.) 



LAuUute/ UtaJxiuts 

in his new comedy • 

The Great DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by Charles Chaplin 
idth PAULETTE GODDARD 
Jack Oakie • Henry Daniell • Reginald Gardiner 
Billy Gilbert • Maurice Moscovich 

Released thru United Artists 


CAPITOL THEATRE 

* B’WAY & 51st STREET 
Regular continuous performances. 
Come any thne and see a complete 
show. Doors open at 9 a.m. 

PRICES: 

Before 5 p. m.. Orchestra and Bal¬ 
cony, 75c. (Saturday. Sunday and 
Holidays Before 3 p.m.) After 5 
p. m., Orchestra and Balcony. $1.10. 
(Saturday, Sunday and Holidays 
after 3 p.m.) All Prices Include Tax. 

Don't forget — Reserved Seats now 
performances. Mail Orders j 


ASTOR THEATRE 

B’WAY & 45th STREET 
Matinees at 2:45. Evenings at 8:45. 
(Extra Midnight Show Saturday and 
Extra 6 p.m. show on Sunday.) 
PRICES: 

Matinees, 75c, 85c, $1.10. (Saturday, 
Sunday and Holiday Matinees; also 
Midnight and Extra Shows—75c, 85c, 
$1.10, $1.65.) Evenings, $1.10, $1.65, 
$2.20 (including Saturday, Sunday 
& Holidays). All Prices Include Tax. 

t sale at the Astor for all subsequent 
Astor filled in order of receipt. 


Ad No. 23C— Three col. x 1 33 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 











































that will be heard round the world! 



Produced, written and directed by 


CHARLES CHAPLIN 
with PAULETTE GODDARD 

Jack Oakie • Henry Daniell 
Reginald Gardiner • Billy Gilbert 
Maurice Moscovich 
Released thru United Artists 


Chaplin talks in his new comedy masterpiece 


Detail 

THEATRE Goes Here 



* 





J\ 

'} 


Ad No. 67D —Four col. x 125 lines 
(Mat .60; Cut 1.00) 














/ 



talks in his neiv comedy < 

The Great DICTATOR 


Produced, written and directed by Charles Chaplin 
with PAULETTE GODDARD 
Jack Oakie • Henry Daniell • Reginald Gardiner 
Billy Gilbert • Maurice Moscovich 

Released thru United Artists 


THEATRE 


Detail 
Goes Here 


Ad No. 63D —Four col. x 140 lines 
(Mat .60; Cut 1.00) 


A 











The laughs start TOMORROW at 9:30 a.m. 


He talks 
in his new 
comedy 
masterpiece! 




in * 

The Great DICTATOR 



Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLES CHAPLIN 

with PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAKIE . HENRY DANIELL 
REGINALD GARDINER . BILLY GILBERT 
MAURICE MOSCOVICH 
Released thru United Artists 


THEATRE 


Detail 
Go es He re 


Ad No. 62D— Four col. x 150 lines 
(Mat .60; Cut 1.00) 



m- 


#T 


ty 


A 

' ) 





* 



CHAPLIN IS COMING! 


talks in his new comedy 


The Great DICTATOR 


Produced, written and directed by Charles Chaplin 
with PAULETTE GODDARD 
Jack Oakie • Henry Daniell • Reginald Gardiner 
Billy Gilbert • Maurice Moscovich 

Released thru United Artists 


Detail 
Goes Here 


THEATRE 


Ad No. 65C —Three col. x 108 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 






in his new comedy , 

The GREAT 
DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by Charles Chaplin 

with PAULETTE GODDARD 

Jack Oakie • Henry Daniell 
Reginald Gardiner • Billy Gilbert 
Maurice Moscovich 
Released thru United Artists 


THEATRE 


Detail 
Goes Here 


Ar 


Ad No. 66C —Three col. x 69 lines 
(Mat .45; Cut .75) 














The Great 
DICTATOR 



HE TALKS! 


Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLES CHAPLIN 


uith PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAKIE • HENRY DANIELL 
REGINALD GARDINER . BILLY GILBERT 
MAURICE MOSCOVICH 
Released thru United Artists 


THEATRE 


Detail 
Goes Here 


Ad No. 64D— Four col. x 1 15 lines 
(Mat .60; Cut 1.00) 

Also Available in Four col. x 150 lines—Order Ad No. 61 D 





that will be heard 
around the world! 


"It's Chaplin’s best—and 
that means the best picture 
I have ever seen!" 

—Ira Wo Iferl , 
N A Newspaper Alii 



Chvdce/ 

in Ins new comedy 

The Great 
DICTATOR 


Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN 
wait PAUL LTTE GODDAKD 

Jack Oakie • Henry Daniell 
Reginald Gardiner • Billy Gilbert 
Maurice Moscovich 
Released thru United Artists 


XX 

Ad No. 69B —Two col. x 85 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 



in his new comedy * 

The Great DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

with PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAKIE • HENRY DANIELL * REGINALD GARDINER 
BILLY GILBERT ■ MAURICE MOSCOVICH 
Released thru United Artists 


Ad No. 68B —Two col. x 1 25 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 




in his new comedy 

The Great 

DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLES CHAPLIN 
with PAULETTE GODDARD 
Jack Oakie • Henry Daniell 
Reginald Gardiner • Billy Gilbert 
Maurice Moscovich 
Released thru United Artists 


Ad No. 72B —Two col. x 53 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 




































TALKS! 


"Left its audiences limp 
with laughter and shaken 
with tears!" —i nez Robb 


in his new comedy 


The Great DICTATOR 


Produced, written and directed by CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

with PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAKIE • HENRY DANIELL • REGINALD GARDINER 
WILY GILBERT ■ MAURICE MOSCOVICH 
. Released thru United Artists 


Ad No. 70B —Two col. x 85 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 



in his new comedy 


The Great 
DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLES CHAPLIN 
,vith PAULETTE GODDARD 

Released thru United Artists 


f~[e talks 

and/ Into/-/ 



The Great 
DICTATOR 


Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAKIE . HENRY DANIELL 
REGINALD GARDINER . BILLY GILBERT 
MAURICE MOSCOVICH 
Released thru United Artists 


Ad No. 75A —One col. x 99 lines 
(Mat. 1 5; Cut .25) 


Ad No. 76A —One col. x 85 lines 
(Mat .15; Cut .25) 














that will be heard around the world! 




in his new comedy 

The Great 
DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by 

CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

wuh PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAKIE • HENRY DANIELL 
REGINALD GARDINER • BILLY GILBERT 
MAURICE MOSCOVICH 
Released thru United Artists 


Ad No. 71B —Two col. x 65 lines 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 



The Great 
DICTATOR 


Produced, written and dircclc.l by 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

Hill, PAULETTE GODDARD 


One col. x 35 lines 



in his new comedy 

The Great 
DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLES CHAPLIN 
with PAULETTE GODDARD 

JACK OAKIE • HENRY DANIELL 
REGINALD GARDINER . BILLY GILBERT 
MAURICE MOSCOVICH 
Released thru United Artists 


Ad No. 74A —One col. x 1 1 1 lines 
(Mat. 15; Cut .25) 




The Great 
DICTATOR 




One col. x 1 4 lines 


Order No. 79A 
(Mat .15; Cut .25) 












The Great 
DICTATOR 


with 

PAULETTEGODDARD 

Released thru United Artists 


Ad No. 77A —One col. x 70 lines 
(Mat .15; Cut .25) 




The GREAT 
DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by Charles Chaplin 

with PAULETTE GODDARD 


Two col. x 30 lines 



Two col. x 14 lines 


Order No. 73B 
(Mat .30; Cut .50) 


* 


♦ 



in his new comedy 

The Great 

DICTATOR 

Produced, written and directed by 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

wm, PAULETTE GODDARD 





f*! 


Ad No. 78A —-One col. x 52 lines 
(Mat .15; Cut .25) 









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Scanned from the United Artists collection at the Wisconsin 
Center for Film and Theater Research. 


Digitization and post-production completed in the University 
of Wisconsin-Madison's Department of Communication Arts, 
with funding from the Mary Pickford Foundation. 



www.marypickford.org 


DIGITAL LIBRARY 


MEDIA 

HISTORY 



www.mediahistoryproiect.org